School teaches people many things, such as magma is lava when underground, mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell, the compsognathus was a small turkey-sized dinosaur, and many other truly interesting things. However, most of these things aren't life skills.

A great extracurricular activity is the Boy Scouts of America. Many of the things you learn here are about how to live as a functioning citizen, such as leadership skills, how to pay taxes, wealth management, cooking, first aid, and on and on. Merit badges introduce youth to a wide variety of potential careers.

While these aren't things that you're necessarily required to learn in Scouts, they're required as you advance toward the rank of Eagle Scout. Reaching this rank is a major accomplishment, requiring hard work, commitment and planning. Colleges and many employers recognize what the rank says about a person, which is why they often choose Eagle Scouts over other applicants.

If this sounds appealing to you, I strongly recommend it to any boy or girl between the ages of 11 and 18.

Jameson Langston

League City

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(3) comments

Mary Gillespie

Scouting does an excellent job of teaching VALUES. I can give a young man no higher praise than to say his behavior exemplifies the Scout Oath and Law.

The leadership skills taught in Scouting are invaluable, and stay with a Scout all his life. We should all aspire to Be Prepared, Do a Good Turn Daily, and Leave No Trace!!

Donna Spencer

Well said Mary !

Bailey Jones

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