There has been warm air and cold water these days. Spring weather. This combination brings in one of the best and worst phenomena along the beachfront: sea fog.

It can be totally clear, and a big bank of fog can roll in unexpectedly. And since the whole coastal plains area is full of water, this fog can extend well inland.

From a lifeguarding and marine rescue standpoint — sea fog is a disaster. Along the beachfront we have to go into a “special operation mode” involving walking out on each groin to see if anyone is getting near the rocks.

Boat operations are a nightmare even with the use of GPS, sonar and radar. Fog affects almost all aspects of water rescue and search and recovery work.

I like all kinds of training on the water, but one of my favorites is the surf ski. The “lifeguard spec” ski is basically a 17-foot-long ocean kayak but is extremely narrow. Think sculling but facing forward with a fancy double- bladed kayak paddle.

Once you have the hang of it, they’re fast and efficient. Paddling at a decent pace, you can make about 5 miles to 6 miles in an hour. I love to paddle straight out into the chop for about 3 miles then head back.

On the way back you can catch little runners on offshore swells, and it’s like taking a long downhill ski run. While getting a great workout, you see dolphins and all kinds of other wildlife and get far enough offshore that you feel like you get some perspective.

A younger guard who has taken up the surf ski recently asked me for advice. The first thing I told him was to get a watch with a compass and never go without it, especially in the spring. With so many spring days having cold water and warm air, the fog can roll in unexpectedly at any time.

I’ve had numerous experiences when the day looked clear, and I got caught offshore. It’s incredibly easy to lose your orientation if there are no reference points.

After one close call years ago where I had to use the position of the bright area where the sun was as a reference point to find my way back, I never went on the water again without a compass.

Like much of life on the beach, and life in general, things come with a good and a bad side. With all the danger sea fog brings, there is good. Earlier this week at dusk, I was catching some nice glassy waves out in front of my house, lying on my board in a toasty wetsuit and feeling connected and in the moment.

The fog was so thick I couldn’t see anything more than 30 yards away. The moisture in the air amplified all sounds to the point where I could hear every gull or sound on the beach for a mile away. The fog seemed to insulate me from every negative thing out there while locking in all the good.

Peter Davis is chief of the Galveston Island Beach Patrol. The views in this column are Davis’ and do not necessarily represent those of the Beach Patrol, Galveston Park Board of Trustees or any other entity.

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