October is the best month of the year in Galveston for the beach. If the weather was porridge in a Goldilocks story, we’d be the third bowl.

Water is still nice and warm, but the air has cooled off just a bit, so you almost hate walking into a building and not spending every available minute outside.

And, at least on the weekdays, the press of people has abated. So, when you go out to the beach, you usually only share space with a handful of people.

Weekends will still be crowded for a couple of months, and our staff has been busy moving swimmers away from the deep holes and strong rip currents near the rock groins, making the occasional rescue and have been getting quite a few after-hours calls. Looking at crowd and climate trends, we anticipate having some pretty decent weekend crowds up to, and possibly into, December.

This is the last weekend for our seasonal lifeguards. We can only work them seven months out of the year as “seasonal workers.” After this Sunday, we’ll cover the beach with mobile patrols each day. This means emergency response only on the West End, as we focus our efforts on the seawall areas with rock groins.

From Monday until the beach finally shuts down (aside from surfers, fishermen and visiting Northern Europeans), we’ll operate using just our year-round staff and will be able to run patrols of two or three trucks a day. These same staff members will rotate to cover “call,” meaning that someone will be available day or night all winter long for emergencies.

If you watch what one of our tower lifeguards does for a day on the seawall, you’ll see them watching swimmers and then getting down to move swimmers away from the rocks repeatedly. These preventative actions keep swimmers out of danger and keep our guards from having to make rescues that are extremely risky for the victim and rescuer.

Working in a mobile vehicle is another story. We do the best we can to get to swimmers before they get too close, but we’re spread thin and covering a lot of ground. So, we end up making many more risky rescues.

We encourage you to get out and enjoy the best time of year in Galveston with friends and family. But when you do, remember the lifeguard presence is greatly diminished, and the safety net is much smaller. This would be a good time to remind friends and family to stay far away from any structures in the water because they generate powerful rip currents.

Know your limits and stay close to shore. Children and non-swimmers should be in lifejackets. Designate a “water watcher” who is focused at all times on your group.

You can find many other safety tips at galvestonislandbeachpatrol.com, and you’re welcome to get us on the phone or social media if you have questions. And, of course, for emergencies, we’re only a 911 call away.

Peter Davis is chief of the Galveston Island Beach Patrol. The views in this column are Davis’ and do not necessarily represent those of the Beach Patrol, Galveston Park Board of Trustees or any other entity.

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