In response to the guest column by Priscilla Villa (“Texas should put communities first,” The Daily News, March 27): Texas has been experiencing record levels of oil and natural gas production, spurred by advancements in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. This boom has reduced energy prices for consumers, lessened our dependence on imported oil, and enhanced our state’s long-time status as a petroleum exporter.

Oil and natural gas development in Texas accounts for about 10 percent of our state gross domestic product, or over $137 billion. Oil and natural gas production directly employs 336,000 workers statewide, while supporting millions more. These jobs often pay wages that are double the national average.

Tax revenue from production is expected to account for $6.7 billion to the FY2018-19 budget, while taxes and royalties from oil and natural gas reaching more than $14 billion last year. That’s funding for our local schools, roads, and emergency services to help keep our communities safe.

These benefits are increasingly being felt in the Texas Gulf Coast, where billions of dollars in investment are going toward pipeline and export infrastructure. In fact, since 2010, about $70 billion worth of manufacturing investments have been announced to take advantage of our state’s massive shale gas supplies. A decade ago, many of these investments would have been made in Europe or the Middle East, due to high energy costs here in the United States. Now the Gulf Coast is leading an American manufacturing comeback.

New export infrastructure projects, such as Enterprise Products Partners’ multi-billion-dollar oil export terminal planned for just south of Galveston, also represent an incredible opportunity for the region. Not only do these projects mean more jobs and economic growth; they’re vital for helping to cut our trade deficit.

An estimated 80 percent of our nation’s total crude exports flow from the Texas Gulf Coast, representing billions of dollars flowing back into places like Galveston, Houston and Corpus Christi. Thanks to Texas, next year the United States is on track to become a net energy exporter.

Unfortunately, despite these benefits, we continue to see reckless proposals — often from politicians and activists located on the East and West coasts — that would end the American energy boom. The U.S. Senate recently rejected the Green New Deal, but anti-fossil fuel activists remain undeterred. Villa opined that “we need to transition to a renewable energy economy” because the “well-being of our neighbors, friends, families and future depend on it.”

Political rhetoric about “transitioning” our economy might poll well among fringe environmentalists and Beltway elites, but it’s a recipe for disaster. Last year, Texas oil and gas development generated $38 million per day to fund schools, roads, and emergency response. The “energy transition” that occupies so much of activists’ lofty rhetoric would, in practice, reduce that number to zero. Such a proposal is a disservice to Texas teachers, firefighters, and policemen, to say nothing of the skyrocketing energy bills that families would be forced to pay.

Indeed, putting millions of Texas out of work, slashing funding to our schools, and increasing our dependence on foreign countries to meet our energy needs isn’t improving anyone’s “well-being.” It’s time to look beyond partisan talking points and unrealistic policy proposals to instead support something we all agree on: keeping Texas strong.

Steve Everley is the Houston-based spokesman for Texans for Natural Gas.

(63) comments

Jarvis Buckley

Great article Steve.

Claudia Burnam

Ditto E G Wiley

Bailey Jones

Yes, it's a boom for sure. Now is the time to start preparing for the inevitable bust. If Houston is to remain an energy capital, we need to start investing in new clean energy. West Texas has the right idea with wind power. Texas leads the nation in wind, with a capacity exceeding 22 gigawatts, supplying 1/6th of the state's needs. Texas is blessed with 3300 miles of shoreline complete with ocean breezes. Assuming a reasonable 2MW per windmill, and a reasonable 10 mills per mile, that's another 66 gigawatts just waiting to be harvested. Add this to what West Texas produces and now you're generating 70% of Texas' power cleanly. Texas is also uniquely positioned for offshore wind because we have a tremendous amount of offshore construction experience. Of course, this isn't something that Steve Everley can support - nor would I if I was employed by a natural gas lobby. But I'm not, so I do.

Claudia Burnam

How much does this wind energy cost consumers above fossil fuels? How many endangered birds have the windmills killed? E G Wiley

Carlos Ponce

"Wind turbines kill more than 573,000 birds each year in the United States, according to The Associated Press, including federally protected species like bald eagles and golden eagles"
"The Pennsylvania Game Commission estimates that more than 10,000 bats are killed in the state each year by wind turbines, the Wall Street Journal reports."
https://www.livescience.com/31995-how-do-wind-turbines-kill-birds.html

Bailey Jones

Carlos - cats kill about 2 billion birds each year in the US. So what you're saying is that the effect of windmills on bird life is 0.025% of avoidable bird deaths.

Bailey Jones

Miceal - you would have to ask U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist Tom Will.

Carlos Ponce

"....cats kill about 2 billion birds each year in the US."
It's part of the "Circle of Life". It's all nature driven. Man is not involved.

Gary Scoggin

Except of course when hunters kill birds.

George Croix

I need to look at the TPW Outdoor Annual and and see when the Blue Jay, Cardinal, and Robin seasons start this year and look for sales on a case of low brass #8s....(key maniacal laughter here....)............

George Croix

https://www.statista.com/statistics/198102/cats-in-the-united-states-since-2000/

I have no idea if this is a good source, but they claim there are about 96 million cats in the country as of last year.
That would mean EACH of them has to eat 21 birds a year to get that 2 billion figure.

It's for sale, but I'm not buying it.......

Pretty much all 'estimates' are little more than extrapolated data designed to make the point the person doing the estimating is trying to make.
In East Texas, we called most of that 'honey wagon filler'.........[wink]
Personally, I wish it were each group of 21 birds fantasizing about sharing a cat for dinner.....[beam][beam][beam][innocent][innocent]

Bailey Jones

Claudia, my electricity comes from 100% wind power. I pay about 9 cents / kWh. You can find 100% wind plans all over the Power to Choose website. Wind power is competitive with coal and gas - otherwise it wouldn't be supplying 1/6th of the energy grid. The cost of wind power has dropped something like 40% in the last decade, solar has dropped 90%. Oil and gas get costlier and costlier as resources get harder to get at. The economics of the future of energy production do not favor oil and gas in the long term.

Claudia Burnam

If you noticed, my post are signed E G Wiley, not Claudia!

Carlos Ponce

"my electricity comes from 100% wind power."
Unless you have a personal windmill not attached to the grid your electricity comes from a variety of sources.
Think about it. Electricity comes from a variety of sources like nuclear, natural gas, coal, hydroelectric, biomass and also wind farms. Does the electricity fed into the power grid from wind farms just go to your house and other like minded subscribers? It gets mixed in with the rest, Bailey.
Look at the map:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e8/Power_plants_map.png
There are more red circles (natural gas) than green (wind) in this section of Texas. Or do you have a wire running from the wind farm to your house?
The closest wind farm is in Corpus Christi. To think - they run a wire all the way from Corpus just to Bailey's house!
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1ct8HeQKWqkHBTZcrH_fnGl6A7Ec&ll=27.090517793813575%2C-96.09402345596783&z=7

Miceal O'Laochdha

Bailey, how on Earth does one determine how many birds are killed by cats each year? Just curious as to how this statistic is developed as it seems like a challenging count to make.

Gary Scoggin

Re: Birds killed by cats. If you see it on the internet, it must be true. But his bigger point still stands.

Bailey Jones

E G Wiley What have you done with Claudia???!!!

Claudia Burnam

What do all little brothers do with big sisters?

Gary Miller

Bailey. You pay 9 cents and the rest of us pay 18 cents for the Fed subsidies paying two thirds of your bill.

Bailey Jones

Yes, Carlos - we all know how the power grid works. How it works for me is that every month I pay (thru my provider) windmill operators in West Texas for 1000 kWhr of power. They pump 1000 kWhr into the grid. I suck 1000 kWhr out of the grid. Obviously there's no telling where each of those electrons came from. The relevant point is that no one would be paying that wind farm if they weren't priced competitively. 10 years ago you could sign up for wind power, but you paid a premium for that privilege. Now it's comparable to coal and gas. 10 years from now it will be cheaper than oil and gas.

Carlos Ponce

So Bailey does not get all his electricity from 100% wind power.
(I hear they're making a filter to stop all that nasty electricity made from nuclear, coal and natural gas from getting into your house, only those made from wind can enter! [wink])

Bailey Jones

Yes, Carlos - I have no control over where the power that enters my house comes from. But I do control where the power that enters the grid on my behalf comes from. And maybe the takeaway from this post is that it doesn't matter whether you're a forward looking progressive, or a true coal guzzling Trump supporter - if you live in Texas, 1/6th of your power comes from clean wind, and that percentage is only going to increase.

Carlos Ponce

"......and that percentage is only going to increase."
Refer back to the map I presented earlier. Most of the Texas wind farms are away from the Gulf Coast. Reason? Hurricanes. No wind farm was seriously affected by Harvey (Harbor Wind (9 MW) on the north side of Corpus Christi, and the Papalote Creek I/II sites (380 MW, total) in San Patricio county) but they were built to withstand a Cat 3 hurricane. What about a stronger hurricane? Wind turbines shut down for self-preservation and the local grid system failed. It could have been worse.

George Croix

'Forward looking progressive' versus 'coal guzzling Trump supporter".......

Well........

Carlos Ponce

When you look at ALL that comes from oil, wind is not going to help. Oil - it supplies us with much more than energy.

Bailey Jones

"When you look at ALL that comes from oil, wind is not going to help. Oil - it supplies us with much more than energy." So, what you're saying is that converting from oil to wind will not destroy the petrochemical industry. Just one more reason to do it.

Carlos Ponce

" Just one more reason to do it." Your logic, or rather lack of it, amuses the intelligent. The items produced with oil are byproducts of the refining process.

Bailey Jones

I'm glad my logic amuses you, Carlos. One more thing we have in common.

Gary Scoggin

Carlos, fyi -- A lot of the plastic products we use today can be derived from the natural gas processing value chain instead of the refining value chain.

Carlos Ponce

Good Gary! But you have to remember that those who believe in "green" energy hate natural gas as much as they hate oil.

George Croix

PLASTIC!!!!!!!!

I should report you, Gary S., for using dirty words .....
You should be required to provide a 'safe space' for anyone offended if you insist on such language.....[scared][scared]

Bailey Jones

It's the market, Carlos. People who "love" fossil fuels are exactly as anti-free market as those who "hate" them. Case in point - gas industry lobbyists.

Gary Miller

Bailey? Have you heard the dirty little secrete? Every wind or solar farm is required by law to have a fossil fuel powered "back up power plant" of equal capacity running on "stand by" in case the sun don't shine or the wind don't blow. Every wind or solar power farm increases our dependency on fossil fuels.

Bailey Jones

Gary, I'd be interested in seeing the law you mention. I'll just add the obvious - capacity is not production. If my math is correct, the fact that Texas gets 1/6 of its power from wind means that 1/6 of its power is no longer coming from fossil fuels.

George Croix

I don't doubt your 1/6 figures, Bailey.
But, what happens to that number when the wind blows less, or not at all...or there's too much bad weather for full efficiency solar cell operation. Power availability from those sources will temporarily drop, won't it?
What picks up the slack?
There are services and industries and such where even a very short power drop, a 'blip' has very bad results....it's not like sitting at home and you lose a minute or two of Jeopardy.
So, while there's no doubt that there are a lot of good uses for wind and solar, there are a lot more where interruption or short supply is intolerable.
Until that bug is squashed, then we should enjoy the useable and viable 'clean energy' we have that works where it can, and if it makes us feel better then BS ourselves and pretend we didn't use fossil fuels to manufacture and transport and install and service those alternate energy sources, and thus pretend we're personally 'saving the planet'....
everyone will feel good, and reality will only be bumped, rather than trampled on.....
Someday, we'll consign fossil fuels to the history books.
Right now, that day looks to be in the real world about the time we go places via being beamed there by Scotty.......

Carlos Ponce

2017 Sources of electricity for ERCOT (Texas)
19% from wind
53% from Natural gas
21% from coal
5% from Nuclear
3% other

2018 Sources of electricity for ERCOT (TEXAS)
21% from wind
54% from Natural gas
16% from coal
5% from Nuclear
1% Solar
2% other
http://www.ercot.com/content/wcm/key_documents_lists/174374/GEWG_021519.pdf
See page 5 of powerpoint

Gary Miller

Bailey. You might gladly pay three times as much for wind power and ruin our view of the gulf but I reject it. Wind farms require, by law, fossil fuel stand by generating plants to be ready to ramp up when the wind stops or blows too hard. Wind farms lock down days before a hurricane. If off shore they might be locked down most of the summer or destroyed by hurricanes. A gas or coal fueled plants would replace the lost output until they were restarted or repaired/replaced.

Diane Turski

I think Steve Everley should take his own advice that "It's time to look beyond partisan talking points and unrealistic policy proposals to instead support something we all agree on: keeping Texas strong." We can do that by making Texas a strong leader in clean energy production. BTW, the oil bust of the '80's that weakened Texas by causing a regional recession was not caused by the economics of clean energy.

George Croix

And it never will be, because 'clean energy' will likely never fully supplant oil or at least not until all the things that use or come from oil are somehow replaced or adapted to an alternative and the nationwide and world infrastructure changed to support that.
But, so what...we'll all be on the path to doom by 2031 anyway unless we get rid of all the vehicles and devices that use fossil fuels, and if we do that, we'll all be done for BEFORE 2031, so why worry about any of it if one TRULY believes in and parrots the lines of the likes of the current crop of Presidential candidates on the Left, all bowing at the feet of an ex-bartender from NY turned climate science expert, despite not knowing the basics of how Congress works when asked...........

"RESIST...reality'......[rolleyes]

Gary Scoggin

Actually, the column is wrong. We are in a mode of energy transition. The irony here is that natural gas is the great beneficiary of it. We are in a long multi-decadal transition from coal and liquid fuels to renewables. Natural gas is the bridge that takes us from one place to the next.

Look at any responsible energy usage projections (IEA, BP, XOM) and you'll see the same forecast -- different numbers and different cases, perhaps, but the same trend. Coal doesn't go away. Oil doesn't go away. Gas doesn't go away. Their relative proportions change with gas and renewables crowding out coal and oil. In fact, with the exception of coal - a notoriously dirty fuel -- all the different energy sources grow in actial terms. That's because the world's overall energy demand grows as more people move from poverty to the middle class. And that's a good thing.

What does change, as demand grows is that efficiency improves. The amount of energy (and the resulting emissions) required to maintain a middle-class lifestyle is consistently dropping, mainly due to the development of better technologies. That's also a good thing.

Bailey Jones

[thumbup] Yes, exactly. The binary straw man sounds just as ridiculous coming from the right as it does coming from the left. And [batman] just for fun.

George Croix

Part of all lifestyles is eating food and drinking water....few of those lifestyles can get their own of either without them being supplied.....
Eventually, digging deep enough, we get to the bottom line in the story.....[wink]

George Croix

Do they have, like, windmill generator seeds that you plant and they grow into functional units?
If not, guess what's used to manufacture, transport, install, and maintain them.....AND provide the backup....
Same for solar cell seeds.
As an adjunct to fossil, fine...actually, good, as the more commercially viable energy sources the better...but as stand alone, simply no way....certainly not before Y2.2K at best....
Use our resources, and our heads....our imaginations come in third....

[wink][wink]

Gary Scoggin

Exactly, George. As I note above, all the meaningful energy projections forecast a mix of generating modes for a long time to come. That mix changes as technologies develop.

George Croix

Well, heck...there ya go busting a perfectly good rainbow dream, where the green unicorn tracks all lead to do-it-yourself cold fusion kits......
Personally, I'm working on how to convert Carter's Little Liver Pills to energy tablets that one drops into every orifice from mouth to gas tank and ZOOOOOMMMM there ya go.....evidently, there's a nearly endless supply of these little wonders available for conversion if the formula can be discovered....[beam][beam][beam]

Seriously, setting forth unrealistic to the point of silly 'goals' just fires up the easily fooled for no good reason and does squat to produce any...any....economically viable positive results.
The 'Green New Deal' is as perfect example of abject stupidity as was the notion that supplements to petroleum could never work for anything bigger than a rowboat...
The facts for our future, our children's, and theirs, and theirs, is in there in the middle...

Don Schlessinger

George, I like your idea of using little pills to motivate your car but I think I have a better way. The design I'm working on is a car body that is one big solar panel. It will charge the car's batteries while sitting and always be ready to go. A small propeller on top will collect wind energy if the sun doesn't shine, and the solar panel skin will develop electrical energy from rain drops sliding across it during a rain storm. Just to be safe I'll use a GM LS2 as backup power. I think AOC will okay this without question.

George Croix

Only if you change the LS2 to a mast and sails, and supplement that with a harness set for the driver and passengers to pull the car after all else has failed....
All this would be funny, is so many...challenged...people didn't buy in to the 'settled science'....

Question for them:
If the 'climate science' is settled, then why are research grants still being issued?
No need to study what is 'settled'.
Perhaps toss in a followup, namely, why haven't any of the global warming models of the last couple decades predictions of disaster come to be?
A planet doomed in 12 years unless we eat all the cows and park all the vehicles should be showing major catastrophic events worldwide leading up to eminent irreversible destruction....so far, the biggest visible catastrophe is the mass gullibility of, well, the masses....[beam][beam][beam]

Gary Scoggin

“Settled science” in that the direction of things has good, but not perfect, agreement, but research is needed to help better understand and predict what’s happening.

With respect to climate models, most develop a series of possible outcomes for different input assumptions. (Think hurricane spaghetti models.) There are usually some extreme forecasts that are highly unlikely; unfortunately, it is these cases that the doom and gloomers usually grab on to. The more central outcomes of the models, based upon more reasonable and likely cases are more likely. These are starting to track better and better with observed events.

George Croix

Gary, you figure that's what all the hardcore 'climate change as religion' folks actually, think, that the 'settled science' is just a direction for looking, not yet a determination reached?
I'm betting a case of cold Diet Coke that you are much too honest to pass that off.....
Personally, I can't recall ever being told by anyone that ANY scientific study is ever settled, other than the folks calling me a 'denier' simply because I don't swallow their climate Mystery Meat whole without looking......
But then, rather than be offended, I keep in mind that so many of them also think we get to be whatever gender we simply decide to 'identify' as, and just consider the sources......[wink]

"Starting to track better" sounds, to me, like a lot more honest than what the Usual Suspects puke out......

Gary Miller

George. Are you saying oil and gas are required to build wind and solar farms? AOC seems to think windmills and solar panels can be made, transported, installed and maintained from or with electricity. She learns nothing because she thinks she knows everything.

George Croix

I don't smoke at all, and never have.....somebody is sure smoking something to pay any attention at all to AOC.....on anything.....
OR maybe SHE found another of an ex-Pres.'s 'magic wands'.........
OR maybe whoever built that mysteriously constructed pink coral mansion complex in Florida decades ago, seemingly by using levitation, passed the secret to his descendents, who now work on installation of 300 foot high wind generators .....

George Croix

https://www.amazon.com/beanie-propeller/s?k=beanie+with+propeller

Amazing.
Right there on Amazon is the answer to keeping our personal cell phones charged.
Just need to add some 18ga wiring and a USB port (?/).
[wink]

Jim Forsythe

Remember that reports of bird deaths are estimates, including death by cat.
Pointing the finger at wind, is forgetting that other thing we do, also kills birds.
No matter what we do , we kill birds. Some industries are trying to address this. The number reported very by source, but the message is, birds are dying because of what we do.
The number of birds killed by wind farms deaths are small compared with other causes. Annual bird deaths of 186,429,553 is caused by human activity. The total of bird in the world is estimated between 200 to 400 billion individual birds.
Tens of millions of flamingos, storks, pelicans and other migratory birds are being killed across the world when they fly into power lines.
Other sources of deaths of birds.
Solar: Anywhere from about 1,000 birds a year, according to Bright Source, to 28,000 birds a year, according to an expert at the Center for Biological Diversity.
Wind: Between 140,000 and 328,000 birds a year in the contiguous United States, according to a December 2013 study published in the journal Biological Conservation. Taller turbines tend to take out more birds. The numbers will go up as more are built.
Oil and Gas: An estimated 500,000 to 1 million birds a year are killed in oil fields, the Bureau of Land Management said in a December 2012 memo. Nuclear plants killed about 330,000 and fossil fueled power plants, millions (this may be high but it shows that birds die each year at power plants.).
What is the wind industry doing about birds deaths? Since taller towers kill more birds, they are looking at vertical axis turbines, which are shorter .
Turbines That Look Like Trees: As an alternative to the designs we have today, inventors are increasingly looking to vertical axis turbines, whose "blades" circulate around a central spire, allowing plenty of them to be packed into a space together.
Also, they are looking at.
Bright Blades: A 2010 study suggested that purple wind turbines would in theory cause fewer bird strikes than the typical white ones. That’s because white blades attract insects, and insects attract foraging birds. So, cutting down on the insects could dissuade foraging avians from coming too close.
Bright Lights: Lighting systems are also being investigated as a deterrent tool: In 2012 the National Science Foundation awarded a $150,000 grant to researchers who showed that UV lighting could be used to deter bats and birds from wind farm sites. Right now, their patent is pending.


Gary Miller

One subject not yet touched is What happens to wind and solar when they lose their subsidies and have to start paying taxes. Instant bankruptacy? Taxpayers paying for scrapping them. It'll take a lot of desiel to drag them down and haul them to recycle centers.

Gary Scoggin

When we consider subsidies, we also need to consider the value of the air and water we allow to be degraded by the use of fossil fuels and the resulting health impacts of this degradation. You can make the case we have reduced this subsidy over time through tighter pollution control standards but the subsidy exists today. (Especially with regards to climate, if you care to go there.)

So to make the marketplace level, we have two choices. We can either subsidize low emitting forms of energy generation or we can appropriately tax the higher ones.

Bailey Jones

Gary Miller - when we start sending our boys and girls to die overseas to maintain access to wind and sun, then we can talk about "subsidies".

George Croix

Yet, the oil refineries haven't gone 'Solyndra' on us and are still cranking out products vital to the operation of the nation and the very lives of each and every citizen of this country......and the USA taxpayers didn't spend 2 million bucks each to create some of those refining jobs.....
Others can do what they want, but I'll talk about useless subsidies right now, thank you very much....
As for our boys sent overseas for oil, that's a great talking point, best served with an entree' of red herring....if you insist, though, you'll notice the decline in that, now that leadership recognizes and acts on the imperative of maximizing domestic production, and can tell the 'jv' from their left elbow.....[wink][wink]

Gary Scoggin

Using Solyndra to disparage Solar, like using the Steelde Dossier to disparage the Mueller report, is sloppy thinking. You're smarter than that, George. (Oh Lord, I hope I didn' t open the Mueller can of worms here. Never mind.)

George Croix

I wasn't using Solyndra to disparage anything but subsidizing a losing commercial proposition, Gary....one that nobody HAS to have for commerce and daily life to function....whereas refining we HAVE to have and which returns FAR more in benefit than it takes in from us.....
I recommend a cold compress for both your knee and your nose....[wink]

George Croix

I've got two solar cell emergency cell phone chargers at the lease....I'm on board with 'green' where it is worth being on board with.....[wink]

Jim Forsythe

Health of humans is important.
Various human health concerns with electricity generation, including asthma and smog, now dominate decisions in developed nations that incur health care costs publicly. A Harvard University Medical School study estimates the US health costs of coal alone at between 300 and 500 billion US dollars annually
The cost is decreasing in wind and solar generating of electricity.
In the windy great plains expanse of the central United States new-construction wind power costs in 2017 are compellingly below costs of continued use of existing coal burning plants. Wind power can be contracted via a power purchase agreement at two cents per kilowatt hour while the operating costs for power generation in existing coal-burning plants remain above three cents.
Photovoltaic prices have fallen from $76.67 per watt in 1977 to nearly $0.23 per watt in August 2017, for crystalline silicon solar cells.
Less and less gas and coal plants are being built. Main reason is unpredictable price of fossil fuels.
35% of all new power generation built in the United States since 2005 has come from wind, more than new gas and coal plants combined, as power providers are increasingly enticed to wind as a convenient hedge against unpredictable commodity price moves.
Federal energy subsidies.
Federal energy subsidies fell between 2013 and 2016, according to a new analysis released this week by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Between 2013 and 2016, renewable energy-related subsidies were more than cut in half, declining from about $15.5 billion to $6.7 billion.
On March 13, 2013, Terry M. Dinan, senior advisor at the Congressional Budget Office, testified before the Subcommittee on Energy of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology in the U.S. House of Representatives that federal energy tax subsidies would cost $16.4 billion that fiscal year.
Some of the subsidies.
Renewable energy: $6.7 billion, Fossil fuels: $3.2 billion, Nuclear energy: $1.1 billion . The amounts above were for 2013 and since renewables has been reduced by about 50%.

George Croix

https://thereaganwing.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/sail_car.jpg

Gonna be a bear to get under the overpasses......[beam][beam][beam][beam][beam]

Paula Flinn

Fracking can destroy clean water underground and cause earthquakes. TIME Magazine did a feature on Fracking and what it has done to the State of Oklahoma. Nothing makes property value fall like your home being in a frequent earthquake area.

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