The little girl sat in the sand with her plastic bucket and shovel. She was completely absorbed in her mission of shoveling sand into the bucket, pouring it back onto the ground, then repeating the process. Stewart Beach was packed.

From a distance it looked like living, multicolored moss covered it completely. The girl had happily found a clear space to pursue her mission.

Unfortunately, the clear space was right in the middle of the emergency lane that runs from east to west. There are also corridors that run from the parking lot to the lifeguard towers. Working with park staff and the security detail, we struggle to keep them clear on busy days.

But the lanes provide not only a clear spot for us to access people during an emergency but also to provide safe passage for beach service, vendors and park staff working hard to keep the beaches clean.

I approached the girl, explaining she was in the “road” and asking her if she’d be willing to move to the other side of the poles. I received an emphatic “NO!” as did the lifeguard supervisor for the area. Fortunately, her mom swooped into the rescue.

The little girl smiled at me, bouncing up and down in her mother’s arms, as she was whisked away.

About an hour later, a mile and a half down the beach, I got flagged down by a couple who had discovered a lost child walking down the beach. Same girl, same smile. But now we were friends, so she rode happily with me back to her mom, punching random buttons in my truck that delighted her when lights went on or sirens blared.

I asked her if she got lost a lot, and she replied, “All the time.” Shocking.

My new friend was one of 35 children we reunited with their families over the Memorial Day weekend. Official beach season opened with a bang.

We also moved 19,413 people from dangerous areas; responded to 55 medical calls; made 11 rescues; worked six possible drowning calls (one of which resulted in a fatality); made 186 enforcement actions; provided 354 tourists with information about the island; and gave water safety information to 4,238 people.

This doesn’t include all the good work done by the other public safety groups, the security program for the beach parks and the staff from the parks, parking and Coastal Zone Management.

One of our guards, who looked like an exhausted prune after spending about three or four cumulative hours of his nine-hour shift in the water moving swimmers, told me he couldn’t be responsible for what happened the next time someone shouted “easy money” or “Baywatch” at him.

I’m really proud of how well our staff handled the weekend. Especially considering many of them worked solo in towers, unlike previous years when they were doubled up for much of the day on holiday weekends.

If any of us had doubts about Galveston’s tourism bouncing back, I think last weekend took care of that.

Peter Davis is chief of the Galveston Island Beach Patrol. The views in this column are Davis’ and do not necessarily represent those of the Beach Patrol, Galveston Park Board of Trustees or any other entity.

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