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December is here, which means the holidays are among us. With the holidays come fun, family and, of course, delicious foods. While holiday favorites are usually eaten around this time of the year, these foods can sometimes be overeaten and be high in calories, fat and added sugars. Therefore…

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I wish we could turn back time, back to a time before social media, back to a time when disagreement on public policy didn’t necessitate hatred for each other. Back to a time when I wasn’t vilified for caring whether people were going hungry. Back to a time when opioids hadn’t destroyed the …

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The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our world dramatically since this time last year, but the needs of our communities are still there. In fact, those needs have never been greater. The uncertainties about our health and the economy have also taken heavy tolls on local support for nonprofit or…

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Once more, we here in Galveston are inundated by Roger “Bo” Quiroga’s claims that overall, Galveston city’s spending is “inefficient” and “bloated” and that only he can fix this “huge” problem. Is this correct, or just political sloganeering?

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Last week’s column left off with the reorganization of the beach patrol in 1981, at which time it began to be funded by the hotel tax revenues that were funneled through the Park Board of Trustees and the management was moved to the sheriff’s office.

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Sixty percent of Austin Middle School’s students are low-income and 55 percent are minority. In many districts, that would be a “poor school,” but local critics want it closed because its magnet program is “disproportionately white” and “represents exclusivity and privilege.”

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I was fortunate to move to Galveston in 2004. I decided this would be a wonderful chance to get involved with the island events, island friends and island life. What impressed me about Galveston was the fact that politics on the island was nonpartisan.

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I stated in a previous commentary — and it merits being repeated — that the primary reason COVID-19 infections are peaking in all 50 states and have now killed more than 250,000 Americans can be boiled down to one word: stupidity. Not ignorance — stupidity.

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In response to the commentary by Marty Fluke (“In our eyes, de Schaun has done an admirable job,” The Daily News, Nov. 21-22): I’m often humored by the audacity of representatives in Galveston who constantly mischaracterize and discredit those who don’t see things “through their lens.”