State Rep. Mayes Middleton should definitely file a bill requiring drug testing of Texas lawmakers, which already is a condition of employment for millions of other Americans.

Hardly a session of the Legislature passes without something arising that argues forcefully for mass urinalysis of both chambers.

Michael A. Smith: 409-683-5206; michael.smith@galvnews.com

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(13) comments

Don Schlessinger

[thumbup]

Bill Cochrane

I support Middleton's idea, but who is going to vote on this? The people or the politicians? I think if the people vote it will pass easily. The politicians - never. It has about the same chance of happening as politicians voting on giving themselves term limits, or banning lobbyists.

Don Schlessinger

[thumbup][thumbup]

Craig Mason

[thumbup]

Dan Freeman

Test them for alcohol too. Voting while intoxicated VWI.

Carlos Ponce

A polling place is considered public so the person could be arrested for public intoxication.

Texas Penal Code Sec. 49.02. PUBLIC INTOXICATION. (a) A person commits an offense if the person appears in a public place while intoxicated to the degree that the person may endanger the person or another.

https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/PE/htm/PE.49.htm

Kelly Naschke

Where do I volunteer to follow Nancy Pelosi around with a breathalyzer??

Roger De Spain

Seriously? Middleton needs to make better use of his time...

Wayne Holt

I can't think of a better use of a legislator's time than filing--and hopefully passing--bills that require the same level of scrupulous adherence to standards the rest of us have long been required to meet.

For far too long, we have had instances of gun control legislative advocates found to be running guns, drug and alcohol abusers coming down hard on users of milder intoxicants and the morality police being caught diddling someone in an airport restroom stall.

If he can get enough support to make brazen hypocrisy a capital crime for legislators, we'd wipe out three-quarters of the Austin crowd in no time.

Curtiss Brown

This is just an effort, long established, to reduce the respect citizens have for elected officials. It comes from a bad place in the heart. An effort to belittle and demean persons who have decided to serve the people in elective office.

Yes, many ordinary people are drug tested in their jobs for legitimate purposes. But this proposal is not sourced in those reasons. Just like drug testing the poor on some sort of the meager assistance governments provided them Merely an effort to demean and belittle. It's a power move to make others do your bidding. Grammerly is giving me an angry face and I am sorry if I come over as angry, but I think this proposal is a waste of time and money aimed at people who seek to serve our communities.

Carlos Ponce

Do you have respect for ALL elected officials? I go by the Biblical passage, "By their fruits, ye shall know them". To paint all elected officials with the same brush as good or bad, is unwise.

Miceal O'Laochdha

Curtiss, I (for one?) do not have the motivation you ascribe to those wanting to see elected officials subject to drug testing. My motivation is to ensure that those who have the power to impose conditions on the employment, insurance, income, and general conditions of life upon their fellow citizens must, at minimum, be themselves subjected to the same conditions that they impose. This, in my belief, should apply not only to drug-testing but also, health and life insurance, pension plans, and similar significant benefits and/or limitations on life where we now find significant disparity between the employment terms of elected officials and those of the citizens they are supposed to serve. When the perks of public office are no longer so wildly superior to that of the average working Joe, maybe politicians will be a little less likely to grovel and sell their souls in order to stay in office; and perhaps even exhibit some small degree of statesmanship on those occasions when moral courage might cost them an election.

David Alquest

Well, most would agreed we don't want anyone on recreational drugs, and we especially don't want lawmakers punishing others when they use drugs themselves. Middleton's bill would oust them and take pensions away from congress members and others, and perhaps a tired official might have a puff at the end of the day - not a serious offense to me.... I think we all agree that we don't want them high or drunk while at work.

It's too bad we can't have psychological tests instead where we could test congress members and other politicians for racism, discrimination, bigotry, schizophrenia, delusions, low intelligence, lying, and self-serving greed. But then, do we know any politician like that?

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