One of the persistent issues local governments face, especially those in smaller communities, is lacking sufficient resources to meet the requirements of federal and state grant programs. The problem is even greater after a natural disaster, when every precious dollar is needed to provide services at a time when people are not providing sales tax dollars and damage causes property values to drop.

The Texas Legislature came up with a solution, proposing the creation of the Flood Infrastructure Fund, which would be administered by the Texas Water Development Board. The state agency would award money to help communities finance projects after a disaster.

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(6) comments

Bailey Jones

"The state agency would award money to help communities finance projects after a disaster...to provide financing for drainage, flood mitigation or flood control projects..."

Does anyone else think that these funds could be better spent BEFORE a disaster?

Jose' Boix

Just focus on just these specific Constitutional amendments regarding the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB):

• The November 6, 2007 ballot included Proposition 16: To provide for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the TWDB in an amount not to exceed $250 million to provide assistance to economically distressed areas. Proposition 16 passed with 61% of the votes.

• The November 8, 2011 ballot included Proposition 2: To provide for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the TWDB in an amount not to exceed $6 billion at any time outstanding.” Proposition 2 passed with 51.5% of the vote.

• The November 5, 2013 ballot included Proposition 6 (SJR 1): To create the State Water Implementation Fund for Texas (SWIFT) and the State Water Implementation Revenue Fund for Texas (SWIRFT) to assist in the financing of priority projects in the state water plan. Approximately $2 billion would be withdrawn from the Texas Economic Stabilization Fund (ESF) – “the Rainy Day Fund.” Proposition 6 passed with 73% of the vote.

On November 5, 2019, we are again asked to consider Proposition 2 (SJR 79): To provide for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the TWDB in an amount not to exceed $200 million to provide financial assistance for the development of certain projects in economically distressed areas. And Proposition 8 (HJR 4) – “If approved by voters, $793 million would be pulled from the Rainy Day Fund to set up the Texas Infrastructure Fund.” All these funds will be “managed” by the TWDB.

We have not had any accountability of any of these funds and management structures, and our legislators continue to add-on. Time to reject some of these propositions.

Don Schlessinger

[thumbup]

Jose' Boix

I meant to say: It is time to reject all the propositions...Just my thoughts!

Jarvis Buckley

# 4 vote✔️ To prohibit state income tax

Jose' Boix

According to Ballotpedia: What would Proposition 4 change?

As of 2019, the Texas State Constitution requires the state legislature to put legislation enacting an income tax before voters as a statewide referendum, which voters could approve or reject. Referring the referendum to voters requires a simple majority vote (50%+1) in each legislative chamber.

Proposition 4 would replace the referendum requirement with a ban on enacting an income tax on individuals. Removing the ban in the future would require a constitutional amendment, which needs a two-thirds vote in each legislative chamber and voter approval.

Therefore, no matter how Proposition #4 goes, Voting for a State Income Tax requires a statewide referendum.

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