(7) comments Back to story

Raymond Lewis

Did I overlook a target amount the city manager expects to achieve through employee cuts? Is there one?

Gary Miller

I can't understand how collecting less property taxes would limit city growth. Limit tax collections, yes, but city? Lower taxes has been proven to encourage growth. I guess they are talking about growth of city budgets which have not been limited by anything except taxpayer resistance. Past city budgets were built on "want" instead of "need".

Miceal O'Laochdha

Another story today tells us the $90,202.68 job of City Marshall, which has existed for less than 2 years, is being vacated and will be re-filled. Here is a suggestion: do not re-fill this newly created job, SAVE THAT $90K+, and then maybe save some lower-paid employee's position into the bargain. There are two typical approaches to reducing payroll. You can RIF a lot of low-paid employees, or you can RIF just a few high-paid employees.

Christopher Webber

City pays Ike recovery contractor $13.5 million By KERI HEATH The Daily News Jan 1, 2019 GALVESTON The city on Monday ended a long-standing legal battle with a $13.5 million payment to disaster recovery contractor CDM Smith on money owed for work completed before the two parted ways in 2012, according to a city spokeswoman. The $13.5 million is $400,000 less than the maximum settlement payment approved by the Galveston City Council earlier this month and $2.2 million less than what a district court ordered the city to pay in November. The court originally ruled the city owed $15.7 million in a lawsuit it lost in September. The city has been locked in legal battle with the company, which used to be known as Camp Dresser & McKee, since officials fired the firm over complaints about performance on a post-Hurricane Ike housing reconstruction program. “The city of Galveston reached an amicable resolution with CDM Smith,†city spokeswoman Marissa Barnett said. The payment came from the city’s general fund and had to be paid by the end of the year under terms of the settlement, she said. “We’re pleased to have reached a final resolution with CDM Smith,†City Manager Brian Maxwell said. “We appreciate CDM’s willingness to work with us and bring this litigation to a close.†The city hired CDM Smith in 2009 for a Hurricane Ike disaster recovery housing program. The Massachusetts-based company originally sought as much as $30 million for work it said the city hadn’t paid for before the termination. The city will have to do some belt tightening to account for the $13.5 million payment, city officials said. After the court decision in September, the city made plans to cut general fund spending by 2 percent, officials said. The city may freeze some positions or cut spending, but residents shouldn’t expect a reduction in services or any delays in capital projects, officials said.

Michael Moriarty

What is the value of receivables related to unpaid fines over the last 5 years, including those deemed noncollectable and removed from the books. There seem to be numerous code violations throughout the city that are never corrected. Is there revenue generated by these and if so, how much? It seems it would have been appropriate to report this at the "State of the City," along with a plan to rectify any problems. Maybe someone at GDN could investigate these issues!

Janis Bennight

Should have been planning long ago not depending on tourism. Take care of your own not your pockets.

Janis Bennight

Posted by Steven C. Bennight

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