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Bailey Jones

Wow - I had no idea. I was aware of the 1918 flu epidemic, but I've never heard of this. I do recall, however, seeing an old photo of the seawall with a sign warning of rat poison - and wondering why.

Thanks for writing this. I guess I'll hold our feral cat population in higher regard from now on.

So much great history on this little island.

Miceal O'Laochdha

Ships still use rat guards on their mooring lines; although not always diligently. And up until quite recent years, all were required to maintain annual de-rat certificates. These were issued by the inspectors from the USDA. Many ships still maintain them, although they are no longer required internationally.

Bailey Jones

That would have been handy 500 years ago - before the Euros brought us these nasty brown rats. I don't know what sort of rat they displaced, but I bet it was a nicer one.

Jack Reeves

I worked longshore in the 70's while in college and was a shakey witness to some gargantuan resident rats on freighters in port. Sometimes, the rats would run topside with a huge snake in hot pursuit. The money was great but the nightmares were outrageous! I have since continued to honor those who toil on the docks in honor of free enterprise!

Jim Casey

This is a sobering look at life before antibiotics.

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