Okra

Some vegetables struggle or stop growing in the heat and humidity of a Texas summer. Okra, a southern favorite, doesn’t just survive, it seems to delight in our hot summers, growing ever taller as temperatures soar, spreading its dark green leaves and beautifully colored blossoms.

One bright spot of the COVID-19 quarantine is that home gardeners were willing to get out of the house to spend more time in the garden.

The quarantine provided a great opportunity to take even better care of our plants. The timing was right to inspire couch potatoes to grow some real potatoes.

Dr. William Johnson is a horticulturist with the Galveston County Office of Texas AgriLife Extension Service, The Texas A&M System. Visit his website at aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston.

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