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Michael Kinsky, a professor in the department of anesthesiology, received $718,987 from the U.S. Army to test out an improved method of providing supplemental oxygen to soldiers injured in the field while being transported to a medical facility.

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About one in six children in the United States is considered to be obese. That’s nearly 20 percent of all adolescents and is the highest rate ever recorded.

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I bet that most people do not realize that when you breathe in through your nose, you do so more from one nostril than the other. The nostril more active in breathing switches from side to side during the day. Who knew?

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Upon hearing the term “healing presence,” a number of images might come to mind. You might think of a nurse sitting patiently at a bedside, a clergyman or counselor listening attentively to a person in distress, or a hospice worker lifting up the head of a dying person to offer a sip of water.

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As our children go back to school, we note with concern how over-scheduled their lives often are. Extracurricular activities, tutoring, homework, sports, music lessons, and more are seen by parents and educators alike as keys to future success. At the same time, we may lament the loss of the…

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Galveston County Health District (GCHD) sanitarians routinely inspect more than 1,800 food service establishments for compliance with state regulations designed to protect the health and well-being of customers.

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Many people wear devices that track their activity levels, sleep, and heart rate. The theory is that people can use the data to change their behaviors to be healthier, though the jury is still out on that. Now a new technology is coming out that is so small it can be stuck to teeth and repor…

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It’s sometimes hard to find enough time in the day to take care of everything, but skipping breakfast isn’t the way to shorten the to-do list. Finding quick, easy breakfasts that combine good taste with minimal prep time keeps the morning meal from being a speed bump in the morning routine a…

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The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released a clinical summary on the power of play in enhancing development and executive functioning. In addition to boosting a child’s health and development, play helps to build the safe, stable and nurturing relationships that buffer against toxi…

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One of the hottest new ways to treat cancer is immunotherapy where a patient’s own immune cells are programmed to attack a tumor. This approach is often successful, but it is expensive because it must be customized for each person. Recent experiments suggest a less costly approach that could…

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Her daughter sent me a photo on MyChart. Doris, a long-time patient was an 80-year-old retired nurse who had developed a painful rash on her back and chest. Like a biting serpent, it crept its way along a nerve from her spinal cord on the left side and onto her breast and chest. In its wake,…

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More than just a chance to have fun, play is serious business when it comes to a child’s health and development. From peek-a-boo to pat-a-cake, and hide-and-seek to hopscotch, the many forms of play enrich a child’s brain, body, and life in important ways.

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Doctors have long dismissed complaints by pregnant women about morning sickness symptoms. Recent research revealed that a protein called GDF15 may be responsible for morning sickness and its most severe form, hyperemesis gravidarum (HG).

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Most weekends, an hour or so after lunch, it seems a strong magnet is drawing me to take a short siesta on the sofa or bed. This fits with a natural biorhythm, and after the nap I wake up refreshed and ready to do whatever is next. Before medical school, I learned a technique called alpha-wa…

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The University of Texas Medical Branch’s School of Health Professions celebrated commencement Aug. 10 at Moody Gardens in Galveston with 350 graduates receiving degrees.

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A collaboration of the Galveston Arts Center, local artists and faculty and residents from the University of Texas Medical Branch resulted in a new exhibit “Visual Pathology,” which will be featured beginning Saturday during ArtWalk at the center at 2127 Strand St. in Galveston.

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The human immune system is truly a wonder. It plays a critical role in our body’s defense to invading diseases. Like a home security system, it is on alert 24/7/365. Through multiple mechanisms, it guards all our tissues, protects us from microbial foreign invaders and removes cancer cells t…

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As I came out of my medical training in the ‘80s, it was a common practice to give antibiotics liberally for upper respiratory conditions like colds, sinusitis, sore throats, and acute bronchitis. In particular, children with ear infections, otitis media, gobbled up the yummy pink bubble gum…

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You have heard the stories. The marketing is everywhere. The claim is that e-cigarettes are safe and can help people quit using tobacco products. There may be a kernel of truth in these claims.

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Dr. Nerissa Bauer is part of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ steering group helping pediatricians and health care providers screen children 12 and older for problems with mental illness.

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The scientific knowledge of genetics has increased dramatically since completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003. One of the many outcomes of this landmark achievement is the evolving field of pharmacogenomics. This is the study of how genes affect the way a person responds to medication…

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LaDonna Strait is the new director of quality, safety and performance improvement for the University of Texas Medical Branch Health System. She will oversee quality and health care safety, regulatory accreditations and performance improvement.

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It may be hard to believe, but the back to school season has once again arrived. When preparing for a new school year we often first think of pencils, notebooks and other classroom supplies. However, you also need to be sure your child has their most important supply — protection against vac…

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The circle drive in front of John Sealy Hospital, and one covered walkway, will temporarily be closed for construction Saturday and Sunday. The front entrance to the hospital will remain accessible via a second covered walkway. The closure is necessary so that a large crane can be put in pla…

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Those of us with less than perfect vision would love a new nonsurgical treatment that would allow us to read this article without our glasses. I’m lucky because I can get by with cheap reading glasses, but some people need expensive glasses like bifocals or trifocals to be able to see proper…

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No doubt, we have all been in conversations in which either or both persons do not feel heard or understood. Like ships in the night, we pass each other verbally without really connecting. Especially if we disagree with another’s point of view or political position, we can make the error of …

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Trampoline parks have become increasingly popular, leading to a soaring number of emergency room visits. A new study in the journal Pediatrics in September 2016 showed that injuries from trampoline parks rose to 6,932 in 2014 up from 581 in 2010. While most trampoline injuries occur at home …

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M. Kristen Peek has been named the interim director the MD/PhD Combined Degree Program and associate dean for academic affairs for the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

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About 40 percent of all Americans make New Year’s resolutions. According to Reader’s Digest, one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight and get in shape. However, about 80 percent of these resolutions fail by February, and only an estimated 8 percent of us will keep the…

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This line from a classic Jefferson Airplane song from the 1960s popped Saturday as the title of an article in the Off Duty section of the Wall Street Journal. It caught my eye not only because of old song memories, but its topic of the role of diet and mental health. I share here how nutrien…

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Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Council on Environmental Health issued a policy statement reviewing and highlighting emerging child health concerns related to the use of coloring, flavorings and chemicals deliberately added to food during processing, as well as substances in fo…

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Galveston County Health District is inviting moms to shine as Stars of the Milky Way when Women, Infants and Children celebrates World Breastfeeding Week, Wednesday through Aug. 7.

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The emergency departments from all three University of Texas Medical Branch campuses recently taught Stop the Bleed training to 47 teachers, school nurses and coaches from the Stafford Municipal School District. Staff members from elementary and high schools attended the event. Stop the Blee…

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An interesting article was published in January that discussed the communities of microbes, or the microbiome, associated with a decaying human body. It was morbid, but what was revealed could assist in our forensic analysis of the causes and time of death of individuals. Following the micro…

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Any patient with cancer is likely to wonder if there might have been something in the environment that caused or contributed to their disease.

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Recently, Drs. Erika R. Change, Lauren G. Flechtner and Aaron E. Carroll had an article first appearing in the New York Times and then the Houston Chronicle about the lack of evidence of the benefits of drinking juice and the harmful side effects. A summary of their findings are discussed below:

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Dr. Sanjeev Sahni was awarded $2 million by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to learn more about the bacteria responsible for dangerous rickettsial diseases, including typhoid and spotted fevers. The diseases are spread by ticks and fleas.

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Despite the rising incidence of diabetes in the United States, the causes for the rise in numbers are not well understood. An interesting new discovery adds a new wrinkle to this mystery. Four viruses that normally infect fish were found to make insulin-like proteins. There may be human viru…

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Illness caused by drinking non-pasteurized (raw) milk and other dairy products continues to be a public health problem. It is possible to acquire food-borne illness from any food, but drinking unpasteurized milk presents with one of the highest risks. The risk of illness from consumption of …