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Illness caused by drinking non-pasteurized (raw) milk and other dairy products continues to be a public health problem. It is possible to acquire food-borne illness from any food, but drinking unpasteurized milk presents with one of the highest risks. The risk of illness from consumption of …

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Dr. Sanjeev Sahni was awarded $2 million by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to learn more about the bacteria responsible for dangerous rickettsial diseases, including typhoid and spotted fevers. The diseases are spread by ticks and fleas.

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Despite the rising incidence of diabetes in the United States, the causes for the rise in numbers are not well understood. An interesting new discovery adds a new wrinkle to this mystery. Four viruses that normally infect fish were found to make insulin-like proteins. There may be human viru…

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The cartoon, Wizard of Id, once had the little king being asked, “What do you think about the obesity problem?” To which the king quickly responded, “I like it better than the famine problem!”

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Christine Baker has been appointed associate dean for academic and student affairs in the School of Health Professions. Baker, who joined the University of Texas Medical Branch in 1986, is a professor in the department of physical therapy and holds the Ruby Decker Professorship in Physical Therapy.

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Have you ever experienced pain somewhere far from where an injury occurred on your body? I know I, and many others I know, have commented on this phenomenon. The transfer of this pain sensation to another location in the body is called referred pain. We experience this a lot, and some people…

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According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), approximately 9,000 children a year are treated for lawn mower related injuries. Many of these injuries occur in older children and teens. However, small children are at risk of injury also. I am very aware of the seriousness of this top…

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We as humans are built to move. It seems though that technology has moored us in a sitting position by displacing many of the traditional physical activities of the workplace. Even naturally active children have become thumb tappers, and like their sedentary adults, more obese and prone to m…

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Most University of Texas Medical Branch clinics are closed today for Independence Day. However, UTMB’s urgent care clinics in Alvin, Galveston and on the League City campus will be open from noon to 8 p.m. today. UTMB’s hospitals and emergency rooms on all three campuses never close. All oth…

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Sickle cell was the result of a genetic change that provided a resistance to malaria, but with it came a host of negative consequences. A recent study suggests that sickle cell arose from a tiny change in a gene in a single child, thousands of years ago.

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Most states do not have laws to guide families on when their child is old enough to be left alone at home for any amount of time. Instead, the decision is left to the family. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP’s) parenting book, “Caring for Your School Age Child,” parents …

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“Early to bed, early to rise, makes one healthy, wealthy, and wise.”

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A new parking garage with a pedestrian skybridge to the University of Texas Medical Branch League City campus is now open. Parking is free with validation. Handicap parking areas for vans are on the first level and additional handicap parking is on the second and third levels. Parking for mo…

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We desperately need new and more sensitive tests to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease at earlier stages if we want to have any chance of treating the disease and preventing its progression. A recent study gives some hope that such a test is possible and may be on its way. A blood test developed b…

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In the 2018 Summer Safety Tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics, they once again reviewed fireworks. Every community has various restrictions and bans on fireworks, and parents should be aware of the restrictions in their community. The AAP’s Committee in Injury and Poison Prevention …

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A foundational way to best manage cancer or other chronic disease is to secure and strengthen your social support. This can be a strong family, faith-based or other community support, as well as close friends, neighbors and work colleagues.

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The scientific community is growing more concerned with the resistance of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi to antimicrobial drugs such as antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals. Can existing drugs be used in the war against drug-resistant microorganisms?

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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a much-feared joint condition that is painful and debilitating. Modern therapies can slow or stop the progression of RA, reducing the pain and damage to joints. However, these therapies involve taking expensive drugs with potentially serious side effects for life…

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Hot weather is definitely here. Babies and children are, or will be, dying inside hot cars. Some car makers have implemented a reminder for parents that they have something left in the back seat. Hopefully, this annual reminder will also help prevent more deaths.

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Everyone enjoys a little time in the sun, but many don’t consider the potential dangers of spending just a few minutes unprotected.

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Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, a NASA astronaut and a University at Texas Medical Branch assistant professor in internal medicine, is aboard the International Space Station.

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I remember moving to Austin in the early 1980s. A position at the University of Texas at Austin beckoned, and the first task was to find an apartment within biking distance of the university. We settled on a garage apartment and unknowingly moved in with Periplaneta americana — hundreds of A…

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Water safety cannot be written about too much. Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children older than 1 in the United States. From 2000 to 2006, drowning was the second leading cause of death from unintentional injuries in children ages 2-19. In the 1- to 4-year-old age…

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The Galveston County Health District is encouraging men to take steps to improve their health as it celebrates National Men’s Health Week, Monday through June 17.

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Bobby Marlin, archivist at the Moody Medical Library, and library staff recently received the Trailblazer Award from the Texas Digital Library for their work to digitalize over 2,500 rare anatomical drawings. The renderings give valuable insights into training surrounding anatomy in early Te…

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A 37-year-old woman named Christin Lipinski developed flu-like symptoms and pain under her armpit that was ultimately found to be caused by an infection with a flesh-eating strain of group A streptococcus bacterium, causing a condition called necrotizing fasciitis. She was taken to the opera…

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Almost every child goes through a stage where he or she is picky about food. You can’t force a child to eat, but luckily picky eating usually improves as a child gets older. It can be frustrating when your child wants to eat the same thing every day or suddenly decides that he or she hates f…

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My wife and I just returned from a dream trip to France and the Mediterranean with some indelible memories, awesome photos, great souvenirs, a suitcase of dirty laundry and a respiratory crud that hit us just before we left Rome for home.

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This past week, I completed my training in medical acupuncture. This course covered the basics tenets of acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. For many, acupuncture is intimidating and many have questions about it. Let’s talk a bit about what acupuncture is and what it can do.

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Faculty and residents of the University of Texas Medical Branch’s aerospace medicine programs recently won numerous awards at the Aerospace Medical Association’s annual meeting in Dallas.

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For the first time, we have a drug that could help treat a devastating genetic disease called Huntington’s. In an early clinical trial, the drug, Ionis-HTTRx, reduced the levels of the protein whose accumulation in nerve cells is linked to the disorder.

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A recent small pilot study of 600 parents by H. Lim at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York found that one in three children ages 0-3 years old showed moderate to severe signs of internet dependence and almost two-thirds showed at least mild signs of digital dependence.

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Just when we thought things could not get any crazier, there is a new movement against tap water encouraging people to drink “raw water” that is not treated or filtered. One company in California sold 2.5 gallon jugs of untreated spring water for $36.99. You can also buy water collection sys…

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The Galveston Aging Care Network, a group of aging care professionals working to improve the quality of life for aging individuals through awareness and networking, will have a breakfast program at the Island Community Center, 4700 Broadway, on Galveston Island. The meeting begins at 8 a.m. …

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The final installment of this season’s Lefeber Winter Series on Aging will be about improving the lives of patients after a hip fracture. Dr. Ellen F. Binder, a professor in geriatrics and nutritional science at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, will be the featured …

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We have heard for many years about the ability of vitamin C to prevent or moderate the common cold. This advice was prevalent in the 1970s and was advanced by Linus Pauling, a two-time Nobel laureate. Today, based on more than 50 years of clinical study, there is little evidence to suggest t…