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The scientific community is growing more concerned with the resistance of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi to antimicrobial drugs such as antibiotics, antivirals or antifungals. Can existing drugs be used in the war against drug-resistant microorganisms?

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Hot weather is definitely here. Babies and children are, or will be, dying inside hot cars. Some car makers have implemented a reminder for parents that they have something left in the back seat. Hopefully, this annual reminder will also help prevent more deaths.

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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a much-feared joint condition that is painful and debilitating. Modern therapies can slow or stop the progression of RA, reducing the pain and damage to joints. However, these therapies involve taking expensive drugs with potentially serious side effects for life…

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Everyone enjoys a little time in the sun, but many don’t consider the potential dangers of spending just a few minutes unprotected.

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Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, a NASA astronaut and a University at Texas Medical Branch assistant professor in internal medicine, is aboard the International Space Station.

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Water safety cannot be written about too much. Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children older than 1 in the United States. From 2000 to 2006, drowning was the second leading cause of death from unintentional injuries in children ages 2-19. In the 1- to 4-year-old age…

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I remember moving to Austin in the early 1980s. A position at the University of Texas at Austin beckoned, and the first task was to find an apartment within biking distance of the university. We settled on a garage apartment and unknowingly moved in with Periplaneta americana — hundreds of A…

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The Galveston County Health District is encouraging men to take steps to improve their health as it celebrates National Men’s Health Week, Monday through June 17.

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Bobby Marlin, archivist at the Moody Medical Library, and library staff recently received the Trailblazer Award from the Texas Digital Library for their work to digitalize over 2,500 rare anatomical drawings. The renderings give valuable insights into training surrounding anatomy in early Te…

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My wife and I just returned from a dream trip to France and the Mediterranean with some indelible memories, awesome photos, great souvenirs, a suitcase of dirty laundry and a respiratory crud that hit us just before we left Rome for home.

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Almost every child goes through a stage where he or she is picky about food. You can’t force a child to eat, but luckily picky eating usually improves as a child gets older. It can be frustrating when your child wants to eat the same thing every day or suddenly decides that he or she hates f…

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A 37-year-old woman named Christin Lipinski developed flu-like symptoms and pain under her armpit that was ultimately found to be caused by an infection with a flesh-eating strain of group A streptococcus bacterium, causing a condition called necrotizing fasciitis. She was taken to the opera…

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This past week, I completed my training in medical acupuncture. This course covered the basics tenets of acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. For many, acupuncture is intimidating and many have questions about it. Let’s talk a bit about what acupuncture is and what it can do.

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Faculty and residents of the University of Texas Medical Branch’s aerospace medicine programs recently won numerous awards at the Aerospace Medical Association’s annual meeting in Dallas.

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A recent small pilot study of 600 parents by H. Lim at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York found that one in three children ages 0-3 years old showed moderate to severe signs of internet dependence and almost two-thirds showed at least mild signs of digital dependence.

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For the first time, we have a drug that could help treat a devastating genetic disease called Huntington’s. In an early clinical trial, the drug, Ionis-HTTRx, reduced the levels of the protein whose accumulation in nerve cells is linked to the disorder.

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Just when we thought things could not get any crazier, there is a new movement against tap water encouraging people to drink “raw water” that is not treated or filtered. One company in California sold 2.5 gallon jugs of untreated spring water for $36.99. You can also buy water collection sys…

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The Galveston Aging Care Network, a group of aging care professionals working to improve the quality of life for aging individuals through awareness and networking, will have a breakfast program at the Island Community Center, 4700 Broadway, on Galveston Island. The meeting begins at 8 a.m. …

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The final installment of this season’s Lefeber Winter Series on Aging will be about improving the lives of patients after a hip fracture. Dr. Ellen F. Binder, a professor in geriatrics and nutritional science at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, will be the featured …

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We have heard for many years about the ability of vitamin C to prevent or moderate the common cold. This advice was prevalent in the 1970s and was advanced by Linus Pauling, a two-time Nobel laureate. Today, based on more than 50 years of clinical study, there is little evidence to suggest t…

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They are a delightful couple both over 85, slowly declining, she faster than him. They want to stay in the home they have had for over 50 years, though he is increasingly unable to lift her when she falls or meet her other physical needs after his recent heart attack. The family is uncertain…

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Here is a strange fact: there are more people who own a mobile phone than have access to a working toilet. In the United States, about two-thirds of the people you meet own a smartphone, and it is even higher among younger Americans at 85 percent. People have gotten increasingly reliant on t…

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Do you know that we humans spend 25 to 30 percent of our lives asleep? Do you know that the restorative powers of sleep help us avoid many chronic illnesses? Do you know that poor sleep is a marker of increased risk of cancer, infections and premature death from multiple causes? Do you know …

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King George III of England is most often remembered as being on the throne when the American colonies won their independence. Over the years, there has been much discussion about his physical and mental health. A new analysis now confirms that he suffered from a mental illness.

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Picture this: you grunt, you groan, you strain. Eyeballs, hernias, and hemorrhoids are bulging. Finally, an explosive passage of some hard and rocky material. You gingerly check for signs of blood.

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Dr. Juan Ramon Ortega-Barnett will be the keynote speaker at the 127th School of Medicine commencement on June 3. Ortega-Barnett is a neurosurgeon and assistant professor in the department of surgery at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Ortega-Barnett, who knew at an early…

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There is a recent discussion in healthychildren.org about drug overdoses, primarily opioid overdose. The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to treating and preventing opioid use disorder that will help to assure a happy, healthy childhood.

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A gentle breeze blew through the town of Sverdlovsk (now Ekaterinburg), Russia, early in the morning on Monday, April 2, 1979. The inhabitants of the town suspected nothing, but the breeze carried death. A nearby bioweapons plant called Compound 19 had accidentally released anthrax, and it r…

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We are in the midst of an opiate epidemic with horrific numbers of overdoses, suicides and ruined lives. More people die daily in the U.S. from these painkillers than from auto accidents. This is part of the reason that medical treatments are the third leading cause of death in our country.

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The University of Texas Medical Branch’s 25th annual observance of Earth Day will take place Friday. Festivities will be held on the administration plaza at the intersection of University Boulevard and Market Street beginning at 10 a.m. The keynote address will be by David Niesel, UTMB’s chi…

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Remember when butter was bad for you? And table salt and coffee and red wine and egg yolks? Remember when you shouldn’t eat fish more than once a week — because of the mercury — and when drinking whole milk was almost a sin?

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The American Academy of Pediatrics, Parents Plus, has some suggestions for activities for your young child to do to allow unstructured playtime. First, make sure that you remember to use a portable play yard or safety gates to keep your child in a safe area in case you are distracted. Also m…

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“I’ve fallen and I can’t get up.” This ad for a medical alert system is a bit of a parody. But it is no joke to an older adult who has taken a bad fall and knows firsthand the feelings of helplessness, pain and shame of not being able to get up from the floor.

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The University of Texas Medical Branch and the Shiloh A.M.E. Church Layman Organization are partnering to provide free screening mammograms for uninsured women ages 40-64 in Galveston County.

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More than half of the University of Texas Medical Branch’s 2017 School of Medicine class will continue their medical training in Texas, with about half of them entering the much-needed field of primary care. Of the 216 students in the class, 53 percent will do their residency training in the…