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The University of Texas Medical Branch will serve as a hub for volunteers during Thursday’s Point in Time counts occurring across Galveston and Brazoria counties. An annual initiative that’s held in communities across the United States, the count provides a valuable snapshot of what homeless…

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In a new discovery, scientists found that the origin of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, wasn’t chimpanzees — but gorillas. It also appears that the parasite made the jump from infecting gorillas to infecting humans only once.

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While this column may not seem like an integrative medicine column, I hope you see how important this topic is to your health by the end. This weekend, I have the opportunity to attend the Texas Medical Association’s Winter Conference. I’m very fortunate that my boss allows me to attend. Dur…

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The website healthychildren.org has a discussion on how to stop a child’s nosebleed. A nosebleed usually comes on suddenly, with blood flowing freely from one nostril. Most nosebleeds stop by themselves within a few minutes.

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After an extensive national search led by Dr. Deborah Jones, senior vice president and dean of the School of Nursing, Josette Armendariz-Batiste was appointed as the vice president of Patient Care Services and System Chief Nurse Executive at The University of Texas Medical Branch on Jan. 6.

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Picture in your mind two people seated at a table for hours, only moving to relocate pieces on the chess board that lies between them. Yet, both players are using so much energy they lose weight!

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The Sealy and Smith Laboratory for Surgical Training, Assessment and Research at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has been reaccredited for five years as a Comprehensive Accredited Education Institute by the American College of Surgeons. Accredited education institutes pro…

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For some people, winter weather brings more than just cold temperatures. It brings the feeling of ever-looming darkness and despair with symptoms of increased sleep, a change in appetite, carbohydrate cravings and weight gain known collectively and cleverly as SAD: Seasonal Affective Disorde…

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Artificial sweeteners, also known as sugar substitutes, are chemicals that are many times sweeter than table sugar, so smaller amounts are needed to create the same level of sweetness. The sweeteners approved by the Food and Drug Administration include saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame potass…