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We’d all probably agree that 2020 was a year we’d like to forget. COVID-19 came in like a flood and not only put the world on hold and took precious lives, but it also changed the way we celebrate many traditions such as weddings, birthday and dinner parties, funerals, baby showers, church s…

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When many of us have had to distance from family, friends, co-workers and classmates, our pets have stepped up. Our pets become part of the family. If they're that important on Earth, will there be animals in heaven?

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Technically, “Spiral” is the ninth film in the franchise, and while there is new blood in front of the camera, director Darren Lynn Bousman, who directed Saw 2-4, doesn’t bring a sense of inventiveness to the series or the genre as a whole.

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As a primary care doctor, I treat many itching people. The medical term is pruritus. Usually, it's a straightforward problem requiring little more than moisturizing or medicating a rash with over-the-counter salves, hydrocortisone or antihistamine creams or oral antihistamines.

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Publicity surrounding Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and the recent death of her husband Prince Philip triggered memories of my stay at Treetops, a famous Kenyan hotel built within a monster tree beside a favorite East Africa animal watering hole. In 1952, while a Treetops guest, Elizabeth lea…

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Before you get to an introspection-level, though, "Jackpot" is so darn entertaining, filled with stories of folks who unintentionally struck it rich in ways they never expected. Reading their stories feels almost like a workbook for potential winners: Do you do this or that? Buy a plane or change careers? Build another house? Where? Who cares?

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When the COVID-19 pandemic is behind us, the world is going to be a different place. In the past, massive disease outbreaks have changed the course of states, religions and society. The Justinian plague, a pandemic in the Eastern Roman Empire, changed the course of European history.

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The researchers found added evidence that vaccine antibodies remain highly active against the newly emerged California and New York variants of SARS-CoV-2, and that continued mass immunization can end the COVID-19 pandemic.