(75) comments Back to story

Steve Fouga

I admire your conviction, as I admire the conviction of the young men choosing to protest. For me, such conviction is possibly the best thing about this country. Maybe the very best thing. I LOVE this country for giving us the freedom to make such choices!

As for me, I enjoy watching the NFL and will continue to watch. [cool]

Doyle Beard

Steve that freedom came from the eal heroes of America. Defending our flag by those men and women whom were so brave. I believe we owe them a little respect and its not to much to ask for Americans for 2 mins or so to thank them for our freedom. So you keep on with your support of thankless people and I will keep thanking our heroes while not watching the NFL.

Steve Fouga

Good for you, Doyle. You're exercising your freedom.

No need for you to lecture me about who the real heroes are, although it's certainly your right to do so. [cool]

Mark Aaron

Doyle: [ I believe we owe them a little respect and its not to much to ask for Americans for 2 mins or so to thank them for our freedom.]

Speaking as one veteran I would rather see that 2 minutes used to exorcise racism from our country. Those players taking a knee are among my heroes.

Craig Lindberg

Steve: [I LOVE this country for giving us the freedom to make such choices!]

Should the owners have the freedom to make the absolutely legal choice that their employees, when in uniform and in their place of business are NOT allowed to protest?

Steve Fouga

Of course. I never said that freedom is exclusive to the players. It wouldn't be much of a protest if other people didn't disagree with it.

Craig Lindberg

I wasn't asking about the owners disagreeing. I was asking if you would support the owner's freedom to end it using whatever legal means available: fines, suspensions, contract terminations, etc.

Steve Fouga

Sure. I doubt that would work, but of course an employer can set rules for its employees. We've all experienced this.

In this case I believe the employees would be able to successfully sue the NFL for violation of their rights as U.S. citizens. An employer's rules can only go so far.

To take the discussion further, even though I'm on the employees' side in this one, if the owners would institute such a rule, I would still watch the games. I watch sports for entertainment, not to make political statements. I find I'm just as entertained whether there is an ongoing protest or not, and I bet I'd be just as entertained if the owners blocked the protest. If political or human-rights actions begin to taint the on-field product, perhaps I'll change my mind.

Craig Lindberg

Assuming such actions don't breach employment contracts, what right as a US citizen would the owners be violating by using punitive measures to stop the protests? If the courts were to create that right, what's to stop any employee from protesting his personal grievances while at work? I'm sorry Mr. Fouga, I'll take your order after I finish my protest.

Steve Fouga

"If the courts were to create that right, what's to stop any employee from protesting his personal grievances while at work?"

I don't know, but I hope we get to find out.

In any case, my main point is that I won't miss a football game because of either a protest or an owner's move to block the protest. To me, the game itself is separate from the protest. I won't deny myself the pleasure of watching a football game because of a protest. I realize that many (although by no means most) people feel differently. So be it.

Walter Manuel

I lost interest in football shortly after all of the kneeling started during the national anthem because while these individuals who choose to kneel have that right, I don't have to watch the media continuously glorify or sensationalize their right to protest.

Now we're learning that a basketball player tweeted that the Texans owner should change his name from an "owner" to a "chairman" because he finds the word "owner" offensive.

Well, when this same player pays billions of dollars for his own team, then he can call himself whatever he likes including a "chairman", but until such time this player is being paid by the "owner" of whatever sport he is playing.

Texans players are expected to protest in their own way today because of what the owner of the Texans has already publically apologized for, however apparently they too forget who signs their checks?

Everyone indeed has the right to protest, however the last thing that we need is the media further dividing our country by promoting these protests with every opportunity that they get.

For me, I don't have to watch some whiners who are being paid extremely well doing what they love, further racially divide and destroy our country simply because they can. [yawn]

Emile Pope

Because race relations were so great before then? Tell me of this time of great race relations...

Craig Lindberg

Emile, do you ever stop long enough to think that people like you and Mark that use race as a tool are as much to blame as anyone for the current state of race relations?

Emile Pope

I'll assume that you don't have an answer to my question...deflect, deflect, deflect...

Craig Lindberg

What question? You made a strawman political statement disguised as a question and you did it to deflect from Walter's comment that you couldn't refute. Now you accuse me of deflecting? Hypocrite much?

Mark Aaron

Craig: [Emile, do you ever stop long enough to think that people like you and Mark that use race as a tool are as much to blame as anyone for the current state of race relations? ]

We facilitate change by speaking up about the truth so long ignored. I don't see that as a bad thing. Why do you?

Craig Lindberg

Mark: [We facilitate change by speaking up about the truth so long ignored. I don't see that as a bad thing. Why do you?]

I think it would be great if you spoke the truth. Let me know when you plan to start. How many deceptions, misstatements, mistakes, etc. have I caught you in over the past few weeks? 50? More? Your claims that you speak the truth are a joke.

Mark Aaron

Craig: [I think it would be great if you spoke the truth. Let me know when you plan to start. How many deceptions, misstatements, mistakes, etc. have I caught you in over the past few weeks? 50? More? Your claims that you speak the truth are a joke.]

When you attack with snotty assertions I always know you are out of viable arguments.

Mark Aaron

Walter: [For me, I don't have to watch some whiners who are being paid extremely well doing what they love, further racially divide and destroy our country simply because they can.]

What do you believe the players around the country are protesting?

Craig Lindberg

Mostly because they are dumber than a sack of rocks.

Mark Aaron

"What do you believe the players around the country are protesting?"

Craig: [ Mostly because they are dumber than a sack of rocks. ]

I'll just let that comment speak for itself.

Mike Trube

I too am one that is boycotting the games and their sponsors. I've been looking at the stats from different sources, while the numbers may vary, the numbers are down for tv viewers and those attending the games. The sources compare the numbers from the 2015 season, before the kneeling began. While the networks have chosen not to show the stands nor the kneelers, there's those folks attending the games use their cell phones to record the many empty seats in the stadiums. I've also read where some ticket sellers are selling tickets as low as $6. What does that tell you? Then there's the ridiculous statement by Jesse Jackson that picking up a football is no difference in picking cotton. This whole thing has gotten so out of hand. The owners and coaches need to grow some nerves and put their feet down and say enough is enough! I sincerely hope congress signs the bill that takes away the billions of dollars of our tax dollars that they give to the NFL. Can you honestly believe the NFL has a tax exempt status? That's unbelievable! But true.

Connie

Emile Pope

Where are these tickets? I'd like to buy a bunch.

Mark Aaron

Emile: [Where are these tickets? I'd like to buy a bunch. ]

Me too. My kids would love them.

Craig Lindberg

What really needs to be ended is the NFL's antitrust exemption that is worth $billions to them. Democrats were leading the charge to end it until the protests started. Now, good luck finding a single one that thinks it should happen. Imagine that, Democrats supporting a monopoly benefiting only millionaires and billionaires??? Politics does make strange bedfellows...

Jim Forsythe

"Bell lobbied Congress to pass an antitrust exemption after the decision, and had almost succeeded before he died. His successor, Pete Rozelle, continued the effort, but was only able to get limited exemptions to allow sharing of television revenues (the Sports Broadcasting Act of 1961) and, later, the merger with the American Football League (AFL). Since the Court's ruling means professional football is covered under antitrust law, the NFL has faced a number of competing leagues and lawsuits it would not otherwise be subject to."
The NFL was granted an Anti-trust exemption in order to complete the merger of the NFL and the AFL. This exemption does not prohibit other business ventures, such as the USFL, but it does prevent an uninterested party from suing the NFL under anti-trust laws, the way that AT&T was years ago. If someone were to start a Football league, such as the USFL or the XFL, and the NFL were to commit acts specifically to hinder their business, their anti-trust exemtion can be revoked. 
Basically, the anti-trust exemtion just allows the NFL to exist. It does not prevent competition or give the NFL exclusive rights to anything. Without the exemtion, the NFL would have to either assist with creating a league that is a direct competitor to the NFL, or would have to split itself into two or more independent organizations

Craig Lindberg

Jim: [Basically, the anti-trust exemtion just allows the NFL to exist. It does not prevent competition or give the NFL exclusive rights to anything.]

That's incorrect. The Sports Broadcasting Act of 1961, as amended, allows the NFL to negotiate as a monopoly for the sale radio and television broadcasts rights. Without it, the teams would have to negotiate separately and as a whole, the league would lose $billions.

The 1961 Sports Broadcasting Act was the first piece of gift-wrapped legislation, granting the leagues legal permission to conduct television-broadcast negotiations in a way that otherwise would have been price collusion. Then, in 1966, Congress enacted Public Law 89‑800, which broadened the limited antitrust exemptions of the 1961 law. Essentially, the 1966 statute said that if the two pro-football leagues of that era merged—they would complete such a merger four years later, forming the current NFL—the new entity could act as a monopoly regarding television rights. Apple or ExxonMobil can only dream of legal permission to function as a monopoly: the 1966 law was effectively a license for NFL owners to print money. Yet this sweetheart deal was offered to the NFL in exchange only for its promise not to schedule games on Friday nights or Saturdays in autumn, when many high schools and colleges play football.

Public Law 89-800 had no name—unlike, say, the catchy USA Patriot Act or the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Congress presumably wanted the bill to be low-profile, given that its effect was to increase NFL owners’ wealth at the expense of average people. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/10/how-the-nfl-fleeces-taxpayers/309448/?single_page=true

"In 1961, Congress approved legislation that allowed professional football teams to pool together when negotiating radio and television broadcasts rights. The law, signed by President John F. Kennedy, was the first action by the federal government that would spur the growth of a multi-billion-dollar enterprise, academics say. CBS paid $2 million for the right to broadcast the NFL’s championship game in 1966, the year Congress approved the NFL’s merger with the AFL and expanded the combined league’s antitrust exemption. The idea was to support the fledgling sports league. Today, however, the NFL makes an estimated $7 billion in revenues just from their television deals. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2014/09/16/how-the-government-helps-the-nfl-maintain-its-power-and-profitability/?utm_term=.2f1ec51fee96

Mark Aaron

Craig:: [What really needs to be ended is the NFL's antitrust exemption that is worth $billions to them. Democrats were leading the charge to end it until the protests started. Now, good luck finding a single one that thinks it should happen. Imagine that, Democrats supporting a monopoly benefiting only millionaires and billionaires??? Politics does make strange bedfellows...]

Your straw herring stinks Craig. The GOP is in charge, why aren't they doing something about this give-a-way to billionaires? In fact everything about the modern GOP is about Billionaire Welfare, isn't it?. Why do you support that Craig? Surely you don't enjoy being taken advantage of by the Billionaires, do you?

Craig Lindberg

Straw herring? Look in the mirror kiddo. Here you go again with your famous disingenuous “arguments.” Despite calling for it in the past, Democrats won't touch this now because it would be seen as going against the protesters. It's pure political hypocrisy.

You say “The GOP is in charge, why aren't they doing something about this give-a-way to billionaires?” Maybe because hypocrite liberals like you who put politics ahead of policy would criticize them if they did – saying it’s some sort of payback for allowing the protests.

Mark Aaron

Craig: [Maybe because hypocrite liberals like you who put politics ahead of policy would criticize them if they did]

So the GOP won't act because they are afraid the Democrats might say something mean about them? Do you know how ridiculous that sounds?

Craig Lindberg

Mark: [So the GOP won't act because they are afraid the Democrats might say something mean about them? Do you know how ridiculous that sounds?]

Unlike the abject nonsense that flows continuously from your fingertips, it’s not ridiculous at all. It even has a name: demagoguery. You know it good and well. For example, it’s why you and the others on the left play the race card.

Mark Aaron

Craig: [Unlike the abject nonsense that flows continuously from your fingertips, it’s not ridiculous at all. It even has a name: demagoguery. You know it good and well. For example, it’s why you and the others on the left play the race card.]

You are still saying the reason why the GOP won't stop the NFL billionaires' monopoly is because they are snowflakes, afraid the Democrats will attack them for restricting billionaires. Oh sure.

Craig Lindberg

Mark: [You are still saying the reason why the GOP won't stop the NFL billionaires' monopoly is because they are snowflakes, afraid the Democrats will attack them for restricting billionaires. Oh sure.]

I know you are that disingenuous, but are you really that simple minded too? Go back and re-read my comment. Notice how it starts with “maybe.” Clearly that's sarcasm, and just as clearly it doesn’t suggest it to be “the” reason let alone the only reason. I’m sure it’s not as evidenced by Republicans never trying to undo it so far as I know. So what? Heck you didn’t even know there was such a thing until you read my post, and now you’re all indignant? Give me a break.

The simple fact of the matter is that Democrats would without a doubt demagogue the issue IF the Republicans tried to do it today. Likewise, Democrats, despite trying to undo it in the recent past, wouldn't touch it today because they are hypocrites who put politics over policy.

Quotes like this are what make you the poster boy for intellectual dishonesty: “…because they are snowflakes, afraid the Democrats will attack them for restricting billionaires.” You just can’t help yourself when it comes to setting up strawmen. “Afraid the Democrats will attack them for restricting billionaires?” You know that pure unadulterated BS. The Dems would play the race card almost immediately and spin it to be about CK and other African-American players and claiming that Republicans support the police mistreatment of minorities and this is payback for talking out against it. The would make it about retaliation for the NFL not coming out against these righteous protests. They would make it about any and every liberal cause they could EXCEPT “restricting billionaires.”

Gary Miller

Yesterday I watched some really good football. Today I'll watch really good golf. The protesters are not exorcising their first amendment rights. It doesn't apply in the work place where the employer sets the rules of employment. Pro football is a business and if the owners let this continue they deserve the results.

Steve Fouga

You guys missed a really good game this afternoon, one the Texans should have won.

Carlos Ponce

I heard about that one. Texans took a knee, Texans lost.

Craig Lindberg

Maybe they would have won if they were as focused on football as they are on their righteous indignation.

Steve Fouga

Nah, they were barely beaten by a superior team. It was their best effort of the season. If anything, they were pumped up by the protest. I haven't seen as much fire out of the Texans... well, ever.

If you had watched the game, you would have seen the same.

Craig Lindberg

When you're "barely beaten" is when the small things matter.

Steve Fouga

You must have totally missed my point. I assert that the protest might be what made the game close, rather than an easy Seattle win. Of course we'll never know, but solidarity is nearly always a good thing for a team.

Craig Lindberg

No, I got your point, however one can just as easily assert that the distraction of the protest is why they lost a close game they might otherwise have won.

Steve Fouga

"one can just as easily assert that the distraction of the protest is why they lost a close game they might otherwise have won."

You could, but I doubt you would have if you had seen the game.

Walter Manuel

I agree Carlos, I wasn't surprised nor saddened by the fact that the Texans lost yesterday.

Obviously, this whole thing has become a "follow the leader" issue with a bunch of "followers" rather than the TRUE "leaders" they want others to believe.

I wonder if Kaepernick jumped off of a bridge, these same sheeples would do the same?
People should consider Kaepernick's true mentality when he reportedly became offended because he was "excluded" from a recent "Owner-Player" meeting.

Last I heard, Kaepernick is STILL not a player, so why would he be included in that meeting???

Stupid is as stupid does and you just can't fix that! [rolleyes]

Blanca Bell

We can stop this by not going or watching the games, buying merchandise. I don't understand why the players are biting the hand that feeds them. I for one will no longer feed them.
Don't let the tail wag the dog!
Is that politically correct enough for the players?

Diane Brodie

In comparison, the Baseball teams stand for the anthem and are showing commercials about not needing a safe space but just a space. It's about making a difference in young lives by volunteering to be a Big Brother or Sister. That's putting your concern into action and something the spoiled millionaire NFL players don't get. They defend criminals, demonize and encourage violence on police officers and offend people who might otherwise be sympathetic to their cause. So glad we have the Astros for a few more days. Skip Monday night Football and get some sleep tonight. Tuesday game 6 is on!

Keith Gray

I'm boycotting... just because I hate politics in sports. Remember when we boycotted the Olympics when it was in Russia? I hated that all those medals in both summer and winter games should have *. Count the tickets I don't buy... count the NFL products I don't buy, and let Academy send them back... I measure about 1 to 1.5k a year... so maybe Emile will pick up my slack... or someone else who doesn't care about the disrespect to my father in law or the others who served and was blown off his tank in combat for our Country... want to see a statistical count or a website? How about WWW.starveyouspoiledathlete.com or WWW.protestyouoverpaidshowboaterson yourowntime.com...

Steve Fouga

Keith posts: "or someone else who doesn't care about the disrespect to my father in law or the others who served and was blown off his tank in combat for our Country..."

You must not have heard the reason for the protest. It's not about your father-in-law or other combat veterans, it's about black people being killed for questionable reasons. The athletes are protesting what they consider to be an injustice, which our freedom allows them to do.

You can consider the flag and the playing of the anthem as sacred Americana, but really they're just symbols of our freedom.

Our combat veterans fought for the freedom itself, not the symbols.

Carlos Ponce

Steve posts "but really they're just symbols of our freedom." Yes the anthem and the flag are symbols of freedom - but they represent far more than that. They represent each man and woman who has served in this country's service. They represent those who have given their lives in defense of this country.
Those who take a knee need a Donald Duck experience.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bn20oXFrxxg

Steve Fouga

"They represent each man and woman who has served in this country's service. Carlos says: "They represent those who have given their lives in defense of this country."

Of course they do!

They also represent you, me, Colin Kaepernick, and every other American. They're the U.S. flag and anthem, not the U.S. military flag and anthem.

Keith Gray

I heard Steve... when they protest on their own dime and with a priority, they may get my attention.

Steve Fouga

I hear you, Keith. I'll say again, though, it wouldn't be much of a protest if people didn't disagree with it.

Walter Manuel

Perhaps the NFL football players need to stand up and look towards Detroit where there are black-on-black murders being done on a daily basis and do something about that if they really want to make a difference in this world.

There are just as many other nationalities being innocently killed, so where are the protest for those people and their families?

Do they not matter as well or is it simply only African Americans?

If these sheeples are kneeling for equal rights, then they should be standing for everyone's equal rights, otherwise their no better than the people that they are protesting against.[yawn]

Keith Gray

Steve you can not only draw attention, but respect to a proper argument when done right. Show me where one "shock" type protest ended well.

Steve Fouga

Keith, they never do, by themselves.

Like I said below, it takes determination and years to accomplish anything. If the anthem protests ever "succeed," it will be because they catch the attention of someone or some group who CAN make something happen. A vocal owner or owners who understand both the economic effect on the league and the social impact of unnecessary killings, a sympathetic white congressperson or senator, an articulate player who doesn't kneel but still supports the cause.

All the protest itself will do is raise awareness for their cause, and earn the enmity of people who otherwise would be fans, like yourself and others on this forum.

Keith Gray

Steve it won't happen.... people with the $s are walking away. It is another dixie chicks on steroids. So let them do the same thing over and over and fail... there is an old saying about that. If they would all do something significant like become Big Brothers, it would gain positive reactions... but I see spoiled athletes insulting the hand that feeds them... so let's see how it all works out. I know if I was an agent of some, I would be advising towards the Big Brother gig... IMHO

Steve Fouga

Big Brother gig is always a good idea.

Jim Forsythe

"Keith Gray Oct 31, 2017 9:37pm
Steve it won't happen.... people with the $s are walking away."

One  part of the money and the NFL, is gambling. 

Of the projected $95 billion that will be gambled on football throughout the 2015 season, nearly $93 billion will be gambled illegally, the American Gaming Association said in a news release. Last season’s Super Bowl alone purportedly produced nearly $4 billion in illegal wager

Carlos Ponce

Jim, as you posted - "illegal".

Jim Forsythe

Carlos Ponce Nov 1, 2017 1:16pm
Jim, as you posted - "illegal".

Yes , illegal and also legal.
Name a city that does not have illegal gambling going on. You can bet on almost anything, if you want too.
Churches have gambling , bingo and other actives. The State of Texas has gambling, to raise funds.

A lot of people play football pots, bet with bookies, play pull tabs, bingo , Lotto, poker rooms, and Hitchcock has game rooms.
Is your point we do not have gambling, or that we have illegal gambling?

Carlos Ponce

Jim, you're the one who posted "illegal" in the first place.

Jim Forsythe

Your point is what ? Both illegal and legal gambling is going on.
It can be found in any City, in Galveston County.

Carlos Ponce

Jim Forsythe Nov 1, 2017 9:28am "Last season’s Super Bowl alone purportedly produced nearly $4 billion in illegal wager."
Jim, it's from YOUR POST.
All I posted was "Jim, as you post 'illegal'. "
So why get upset with me over something YOU posted and I agreed with?????

Bill Cochrane

Question? Why do they have to take a knee or protest during the Anthem? If it's for effect, or attention, why not walk off the field before the game in protest? Better yet, just quit the NFL and devote your life (and millions you made) to this cause. Boy that would get you some attention.

Mark Aaron

Bill: [Question? Why do they have to take a knee or protest during the Anthem? If it's for effect, or attention, why not walk off the field before the game in protest?]

Why do you think you are the one who gets to decide where and when Black people get to protest?

Craig Lindberg

Mark, how do you not see the hypocrisy in that question? Why do you think you are the one who gets to decide where and when Black people get to use a gun to defend themselves?

Mark Aaron

Craig: [Why do you think you are the one who gets to decide where and when Black people get to use a gun to defend themselves?]

Public safety trumps your gun fetish Craig.

Jim Forsythe

Do I stand for the anthem, yes, ,but where you and I may differ, is a person right to protest on the sidelines. Some people are protesting the NFL by not buying their product, which is great, and no one should force them, to buy or watch.
The part about players not standing for their protest is were we may be different. Some people think that it is un American  which is great, and they should continue thinking this.  If  this is your stance, I hope you continue your protest. against the NFL.
My take is different, because of a Uncle that died in WW11.
My thinking is that he died, so people could have the right to protest. Not to limit protest. 

Everyone that protest, may lose money because they get part of the jerseys money and such. They are also aware that they could be suspended or let go. If you are going to protest ,you must be willing to receive the outcome from your actions.


"Colin Kaepernick jersey is No. 17 best-selling jersey of May 2017. New ... of them is jersey sales. ... the most recent ranking of top selling jerseys, for May 2017"

Craig Lindberg

Jim writes: [If you are going to protest, you must be willing to receive the outcome from your actions.]

This is the bottom line. Free speech is not necessarily free. Way too many people don’t understand this.

Steve Fouga

Yes, Jim and Craig.

Protesters are seldom liked, are they? Looking back to the 60s, a time of protesting the war, inequality, lack of respect for the environment, etc., the protesters were roundly disliked. They were not popular. They were a TINY minority. They were beaten, arrested, punished, a few even lost their lives. But over time, and because of their persistence, people heard and the minority became larger, and the protests became movements. Eventually enough people were swayed, and politicians heard, and laws were changed.

My sense is that kneeling has nowhere near the power of the 60s protests, because despite its viewership compared to other sports, the NFL is exposed to a relatively small segment of society. Too bad, because their cause is worthy.

Blanca Bell

I agree with Cochran!

Walter Manuel

Maybe after football season is over and the cameras are no longer on, all of these same protesters will finally make a real difference with their movement and walk the walk or are all of them simply promoting their own agendas while making a profit on such a cause?

I guess we'll all see how to truly separate the goats from the sheep when football season is over.

On a side note..... people better go to their Bibles and re-read it to see that what is evolving today in the world is exactly what was written thousands of years ago and I'm certain applies to all of us. [whistling]

Jim Forsythe

Is this what you had in mind. These are just a few of the examples of what players do, to help. I only highlighted a few.
Most players give their time and money. their protesting and giving are two different things.

Denver Broncos: Brandon Marshall is creating positive change in the community After he first kneeled for the anthem on Sept. 8, 2016, Marshall met with Denver police chief Robert White in what began an ongoing dialogue between urban communities around Denver and the local police. He also pledged to donate $300 for every tackle last season to local organizations committed to addressing “critical social issues.”And for the past two years, Marshall has organized an Attendance Challenge at local elementary schools, encouraging kids to go to school, learn and use their education
Pittsburgh Steelers: Alejandro Villanueva will donate money from jersey sales to USO     Villanueva is donating all money from his jersey sales to the USO and other military non-profit organizations, something he has reportedly always done. However, with his new-found popularity, Villanueva’s donation might be much larger than it normally is.
Houston Texans: J.J. Watt raises $37 million for Hurricane Harvey relief What Watt was able to accomplish, in large part due to the kindness of strangers, presumably the vast majority of whom aren’t Texans fans, was astounding
Deshaun Watson donating his first game check to three Houstonians who work in the Texans’ cafeteria. These people lost everything to the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, and Watson stepped up selflessly.
Arizona Cardinals: Patrick Peterson  Some  of what Peterson does around the Arizona community and beyond provided by the Arizona Cardinals:  Peterson created the “Foundation for Success” which aims to provide low-income and inner city youth with opportunities and resources to reach their full potential. The foundation hopes to implement an excellent balance for community development.Peterson along with his wife, Antonique, visited Haiti as guests of Mission of Hope. In January of 2015, Peterson unveiled the first “Patrick’s Corner” of his foundation for students and families at Nevitt Elementary School in Phoenix.
Atlanta Falcons: Vic Beasley aims to fight childhood cancer with the Rally Foundation
Baltimore Ravens: Anthony Levine Sr. is using a rivalry to raise money for students
Buffalo Bills: Bills players support a variety of charities
Buffalo Rumblings put together a running list of the causes the players donate their time and money to. Here’s one of many:LeSean McCoy is a community leader through his foundation Shades of Greatness, Inc. He assists people and families suffering from ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He’s held four annual charity softball games, the most recent two at Frontier Field in Rochester, NY.
For more, check out the entire entry at Buffalo Rumblings.
Carolina Panthers: Charles Johnson gives back to Georgia hometown and to Charlotte One of Johnson’s biggest areas of service has been providing college scholarships to high school students at his alma mater, Hawkinsville High School. Johnson’s charitable actions don’t just apply to the Hawkinsville, GA area, either. He’s also done some good work in the Charlotte community. He’s also built affordable housing units for seniors in both Columbia and Rock Hill, SC and has plans to build more of them in the future.
Chicago Bears: The team’s charitable arm highlights the players’ good deeds  Jordan Howard is involved with the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Former Bear great, Charles Tillman, has his Cornerstone Foundation. Sam Acho and his family does missionary work in Nigeria.
For more, check out the entire entry at Windy City Gridiron.

Here’s a look at just some of the things the Saints have done and are doing in the month of September to make an impact.
A Community STEM Fest is set for Sept. 30, which is set to feature over 2,000 students and teachers throughout the region to promote the education day.
Brandon Coleman has a put out an experience package for a home game that you can bid on that benefits the Alzheimer’s Association.
On Sept. 19, Cam Jordan visited Smothers Academy in Jefferson, La. to help promote reading.
On Sept. 20, Landon Turner visited Faith Lutheran School in Harahan, La. for the play football experience and to promote NFL Play 60. That same day, Brandon Coleman visited Sojourner Truth Neighborhood Center in New Orleans to celebrate National Healthy Lunch Day with the American Diabetes Association.


Walter Manuel

Yes, some of these players do good out in their communities, but let's see how they continue their protest after the stadium goes dark and the crowds have left?

Just last night a ""nonchalant" gunman walked into a Colorado WalMart and shot and killed 3 innocent people and then calmly walked out of the store".

"At least eight people in New York City have been killed and 11 injured after a driver rammed into cyclists and pedestrians before being shot by police, according to US officials".

"Mandalay Bay: Gunman shot at Las Vegas crowd seconds after shooting guard".

I could obviously go on and on with many more examples, but I'm sure you get my point.

We all have enough to deal with already with terrorist and obviously deranged and mentally disturbed people walking around with guns killing innocent people and so the last thing we ALL need is our own country fighting against one another and bringing more conflict against ourselves.

Some people obviously aren't too concerned about what we already see happening in the world that they don't mind starting yet another conflict in America that will unfortunately have no ending any time soon. [sad]

Mark Aaron

Walter: [Yes, some of these players do good out in their communities, but let's see how they continue their protest after the stadium goes dark and the crowds have left?]

Why is that even relevant?

Jim Forsythe

"Yes, some of these players do good out in their communities, but let's see how they continue their protest after the stadium goes dark and the crowds have left?" The examples that I gave about the good that the player are doing is the norm, not the exception.
Most of the people that are going  to stop going to the games, have. Many people are waiting on these peoples tickets to be released for sell, as several teams have up to 10 year waiting list for  tickets..
As long as gambling is part of sports, the NFL will be part of the USA. 
Of the projected $95 billion that will be gambled on football throughout the 2015 season, nearly $93 billion will be gambled illegally, the American Gaming Association said in a news release. Last season’s Super Bowl alone purportedly produced nearly $4 billion in illegal wager

"I could obviously go on and on with many more examples, but I'm sure you get my point."
. Hope you are not suggesting that the NFL players protest, is not peaceful. To try and interject mass killing into the discussion about the NFL is right because? 

"Some people obviously aren't too concerned about what we already see happening in the world that they don't mind starting yet another conflict in America that will unfortunately have no ending any time soon". Do you think if the NFL players had not kneeled , the mass killings would not have happen.. The examples of mass killings you gave, happened after the protest started! 
Protest, pickets, set in's and other actives of protest , are not done with the comfort of the people being protested against, in mind. 
Please continue your protest of the NFL, which is your right.

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