As beach patrol supervisor Austin Kirwin navigated his Jet Ski to the side of the highway to drop off another group of rescued people, his partner helped them dismount the rescue sled attached to the ski and walked them to shore.

Meanwhile, Austin pulled out his phone in its waterproof case and squinted through the rain and wind as he checked his messages. He had several new addresses that had been sent to him by someone who was combing social media platforms looking for people stranded in the Dickinson area. He chose one and directed the other three beach patrol rescue crews to other addresses.

It’s amazing what a role technology played during Harvey in comparison to just a few years earlier with Katrina, Rita, Sandy and Ike. In Austin’s case, while power was down in many of the areas where people were stranded, they still had cell service and a charge on their phone. While waiting for rescue on roofs, in attics, or in the second stories of houses, many people were actively communicating via social media, text and by making calls.

While our emergency management structures were getting a handle on the immense scope of the problem, some of our more tech-savvy responders were getting information through other methods. Later, when we were getting addresses directly though emergency management, the process was much more efficient. But during the early stages, new technology was pretty useful.

There’s a web-based program that emergency management centers use to coordinate aid and requests for aid now. If you are leading a city, county or emergency response group, you can request what you need via this program. It will be assessed and compared to other groups offering all kinds of aid.

There was also an app created during Harvey to coordinate first responders in Houston. And there are several apps you can go to for requesting everything from donations of clothing or household items to volunteers who are willing to come help you rip the Sheetrock out of your walls.

My crew used cellphones more than their radios to keep track of each other by sending maps with pins in them to indicate an address they need to evacuate people from to showing each other what their location is. I was pretty impressed with my team.

Most are young and tech savvy and did an amazing job of combining their grasp of newer technology with a strong base of rescue skills. But, even as this played out, a little voice in my head was saying not to become dependent on this.

One thing those who have gone through a few disasters learn is that each crisis is very different and you can’t count on anything. Just because cellphones worked during Harvey doesn’t mean that we can count on that for the next one.

Modern responders are using new tools and technology to the best advantage, but should remain flexible and build redundant systems into any preparation or response.

Peter Davis is chief of the Galveston Island Beach Patrol. The views in this column are Davis’ and do not necessarily represent those of the beach patrol, Galveston Park Board of Trustees or any other entity.

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