Lawsuits, multiple investigations on the state and federal level, plus the USW Union and BP's own investigation created thousands of pages of documents related to the 2005 explosion at the Texas City refinery that killed 15 people and injured more than 170.

Below is a selection of some of the most critical of those documents related to the tragedy.


"Texas City is not a safe place to work"

In November 2014, about four months before the fatal explosions, then BP Texas City refinery manager Don Parus traveled to BP corporate headquarters in London and presented a slide show entitled "Texas City is not a safe place to work." The slide show detailed incidents in which employees were seriously injured or killed.

The Telos Report

January 2005: In 2004, then BP Texas City refinery manager Don Parus commissioned a workplace safety study by The Telos Group. The report was based on surveys of 1,000 BP refinery employees and direct interviews of hundreds of workers, many expressing concern about working in the refinery saying there was an "exceptional degree of fear". The Telos Report was released to BP two months before the fatal explosions that killed 15 people.

BP Interim Report

May 12, 2005: Less than two months after the fatal explosions, BP made public its initial internal accident investigation report in which the company declared the "primary root cause was a failure (of employees) to follow operating procedures and a failure of supervision," the report read. After backlash from the United Steelworkers, process safety experts and federal regulators, BP eventually backpedaled on that statement.

Don Parus Deposition 1

June 22, 2006: Former BP Texas City refinery manager Don Parus was deposed by lawyers represented the family members of those killed as well as workers who were injured. Deposition 1 of 2.

Don Parus Deposition 2

July 10, 2006: Former BP Texas City refinery manager Don Parus was deposed by lawyers represented the family members of those killed as well as workers who were injured. Deposition 2 of 2.

Baker Panel Report

January 2007: Former U.S. Secretary of State James Baker led a BP-commissioned panel that was tasked to investigate process safety culture at all of BP's refineries in the United States. The report, released two years after the fatal blasts at the Texas City refinery found, "BP has not adequately embraced safety as a core value."

U.S. Department of Justice Fact Sheet

October 25, 2007: Following the 2005 explosions, the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Justice sought to prosecute BP for environmental violations in connection with the 2005 explosions. BP's then refinery manager Keith Casey pleaded guilty on behalf of the company in court.

BP Agreed Final Judgment

December 20, 2011: The Texas Attorney General, based on investigations by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, sued BP for violations of the state's environmental laws after the Texas City refinery explosions. The state and BP agreed to a settlement in that case that led to a $49.5 million fine.

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