(7) comments Back to story

Steve Fouga

My rule: Anything on Seawall, FM 3005, or downtown has to be "classy." To me that means at least a decent restaurant, a nice swimming pool, a hot tub, a gym with both cardio and weights, as well as, of course, nice rooms and a welcoming lobby.

As for height, as far as I'm concerned they can be tall. I'd feel differently if something blocked a view I cherished, and at the same time lowered my property value. So maybe no height restrictions east of 10th and west of 61st?

Ron Binkley

Galveston has come a long way since the rebuilding after Hurricane Ike. Our beaches are cleaner, the quality of our restaurants has improved significantly and we have added many attractions. One of the few things left to do is to allow high-rise upscale hotels/resorts to be built on the seawall. Galveston needs to be open to all visitors, the budget minded and the higher-end visitors. Bringing in 30 story high-end Marriott or Hyatt is good for tourism and for our tax base. More tax money from visitors is a better quality of life for our residents.

Don Schlessinger

The idea of changing the skyline of those of us living close to the seawall is not something I would look forward to. Take a ride along Adler Circle looking south if you want a great example of a view ruined by high rise buildings. Voting yes or no is NOT something we can leave to the city council and planning commission. EVERY TAXPAYER on the island should have a vote on the subject.

Kelly Naschke

There was NO view in Adler Circle other than your back fence. Or are you like really really really tall where you could see OVER the Seawall and see the water? If Galveston wants to position itself against first class destinations...it needs first class amenities. It’s time to quit thinking small and start thinking big....thinking big means going UP.

Susan Fennewald

Galveston's tourism industry is doing fine and growing.
It's Galveston's residents and population that are struggling and barely hanging on. They're the ones who need help at this point.
The tourism industry and the residents benefit from each other. The residents are both the employees of the tourism industry and customers of the restaurants and businesses that serve both tourists and residents (but may not have enough business from each alone to survive).
Galveston's residents deserve support from their city council. The lots that are under consideration for taller buildings are just across the street from single story houses. Adler circle is several blocks away from the taller buildings near it, not just across the street.

I'm trying to think of an example, on Galveston, where a 10 story building is across the street from a single family home, but I can't.
Can anyone else think of an example?

Susan Fennewald

Also...
The most controversial lots are too small for a high class hotel with all the amenities. It takes room to have a really nice hotel- think of the land around the San Luis, Moody Gardens and even the Galvez. The Tremont is probably the most hemmed in - but it's still big and takes up an entire block, with parking offsite.

The little sites on the Seawall that are the most controversial just do NOT have the space for a first class hotel with all the amenities.

Ron Binkley

Not so true. You can build a tall skinny building on a small lot. Put all of your parking underground. Put the pool on a higher floor with great gulf views. Add an incredible restaurant and patio on the top floor. Think about how they build office and hotels in the big cities like Houston and Austin. They just go higher.

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