A complex weather pattern involving weak disturbances tracking west across the Gulf, an influx of deep moisture, high pressure to our east and persistent low pressure to our south will contribute to a good chance of rain through early Wednesday.

In addition, persistent easterly winds gusting to 25 mph along the coast will likely lead to higher than normal tides, dangerous rip currents and offshore seas of 6-9 feet through Thursday.

Already, tides in Galveston are running about 1.4 feet above what would normally be expected and it is possible that some local advisories could be issued with this.

Pier 21 Tide Chart

On another note, both Galveston Island with 26.67 inches of rain, and League City with 47.69 inches in August, had not only the wettest August ever, but also the wettest month ever observed at either location. By contrast, September was exceedingly dry with Galveston’s total of 0.32 of an inch, giving it the third-direst September ever.

League City fared a little better with 1.02 inches of rain during the month. But even that was still 6.15 inches less than what would be expected for the month.

So it is not unfair to say that some rain would be welcome this week.

Looking ahead, high pressure should build back into the area by the later part of this week, putting a lid on rain chances and ensuring warm, mostly sunny conditions for the weekend.

Meanwhile, a persistent area of low pressure in the Gulf of Mexico is being given a 20 percent chance of developing over the coming five days. The good news is that most models show high pressure keeping any system well away from Texas with some projecting a north to northeast path most likely.

Stan Blazyk is a life-long weather enthusiast, long-time Galveston resident and author of "A Century of Galveston Weather." He has written the weather blog for the Galveston County Daily News for more than a decade.

(2) comments

Lesley Sommer

"On another note, both Galveston Island with 26.67 inches of rain, and League City with 47.69 inches in August, had not only the wettest August ever, but also the wettest month ever observed at either location."

So Stan, I suppose this means then that Harvey brought more rain to Galveston Island than any other Hurricane or tropical system, ever? (At least since we have records, anyway.) That isn't terribly surprising for the mainland, but I am a little surprised that it holds true for Galveston Island as well. Very interesting. Thanks!

Stan Blazyk Staff
Stan Blazyk

Yes. This was the wettest tropical system ever for the Island....though we have had ones that have brought 15 plus inches as they moved through. The 1915 hurricane was credited with 15.11 inches and Tropical Storm Claudette brought 14.77 inches over a five day period.

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